11 Blackpool Promenade sculptures, structures and unusual objects you may not know are there

Over the years Blackpool has seen some big changes and the Promenade has been no exception, with new features popping along the few miles from north to south.

Thursday, 21st March 2019, 1:21 pm
Updated Thursday, 21st March 2019, 1:23 pm
15 Blackpool Promenade sculptures, structures and unusual objects you may not know are there
15 Blackpool Promenade sculptures, structures and unusual objects you may not know are there

Many, like old rain shelters and the war memorial are clear in the mind of residents, but there's lots more going on along our great promenade than you might remember. Here are 11 sculptures, structures and unusual objects - some of which you may have never noticed before.

Glam Rocks installed in June 2001 consists of three large pebbles with constellations of hundreds of fibre optic lights which slowly change colour and sparkle.
The huge steel structure, depicting the simmering passions of a seaside romance, was created by artist Chris Knight at a cost of 52,000 pounds, and was put into place on Blackpools New South Promenade in May 2001.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

The Frankenstein Project by contemporary sculpture Tony Stallard was permanently installed in 2001, and consists of a divers decompression chamber. Inside a blue neon light illuminates skeletons and a killer whale skull.
Have you spotted these and assumed they are another art installation? The structures are actually ventilation pipes, which are part of the United Utilities pumping station.
The two shelters can found in close distance to each other between the Blackpool's tram depot and the Pleasure Beach Big One.
The pebble like structures double as seats where tourists can rest their legs, or sit and take in the sea views.
Officially titled "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?", this is probably the most famous of the objects you can find along the stretch.
The swivelling wind shelter shaped like a whale's tail, is 8m (26ft) high made from stainless steel, and is designed to align itself with the wind to give shelter from Irish Sea gusts.
But did you know there are two?
The High Tide Organ constructed in 2002 is designed by the artists Liam Curtin and John Gooding. The 15 metre (49 ft 3 in) tall instrument is played by the sea at high tide through eight pipes attached to the sea wall.
That's what they are!