Every Fylde coast MP voted to make you pay more tax to fund social care - except one

A majority of MPs supported the Government’s NHS and social care tax rise during a House of Commons vote yesterday (Wednesday, September 8).

Thursday, 9th September 2021, 10:07 am
Updated Thursday, 9th September 2021, 10:08 am
A majority of Fylde coast MPs supported the Government’s NHS and social care tax rise during a House of Commons vote yesterday (Wednesday, September 8)

The result was announced as 319 votes to 248, majority 71, in the chamber. But the division list only showed 317 MPs in favour of the motion.

According to the division list, the Tory MP for Blackpool South, Scott Benton, voted for the rise, as did fellow Tory Paul Maynard, who sits in Blackpool North and Cleveleys.

Fylde MP Mark Menzies, also Conservative, was also an aye, as was Wyre MP and defence secretary Ben Wallace.

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Out of all the Fylde coast's MPs, only Labour’s Cat Smith - MP for Lancaster and Fleetwood - voted against.

The Government has pledged to invest £36 billion over the next three years to help the NHS recover from the coronavirus pandemic and reform the adult social care system so people no longer face catastrophic care costs.

From October 2023, nobody will pay more than £86,000 for their social care – regardless of their assets.

The Government will fully cover the cost of care for those with assets under £20,000, and contribute to the cost of care for those with assets of between £20,000 and £100,000.

The NHS waiting list is also at an all-time high as the nation recovers from the pandemic.

The move will be funded through a UK-wide health and social care levy from April 2022, based on National Insurance contributions paid by working adults.

Between 2022 and 2023 National Insurance rates will rise by 1.25 per cent.

From April 2023, the levy will appear as a separate entry on individuals’ pay slips. It is at this point that working adults above pension age will chip in.

The Government is also increasing the rate of dividend tax by 1.25 per cent to ensure people who receive income from dividends make the same contribution.

The tax will be progressive, meaning those who earn more will pay more.

For example, a basic rate taxpayer earning £24,100 will contribute £3.46 a week.

A higher rate taxpayer earning £67,100 will contribute £7.15 a week.