Abused young people in Lancashire ‘are at increased risk’

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Neglected and abused children in Lancashire are increasingly likely to be in crisis and at risk of significant harm by the time social services reach them, figures show.

A parliamentary report has warned that children’s services in England are at “breaking point”, and need more than £3bn in additional funding by 2025.

Abused young people in Lancashire are at increased risk

Abused young people in Lancashire are at increased risk

The cross-party Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee said cash-strapped councils were having to reduce spending on services they are not legally obliged to provide.

These include children’s centres and parenting programmes, which could provide early intervention for families.

The latest Department for Education figures show around 7,170 children were judged to be in need of support after being referred to the council’s social services in the 12 months to March 2018.

Of these, 3,902 were made the subject of a child protection inquiry, which the British Association of Social Workers says indicates a child may already be at crisis point.

The Local Government Association, which represents councils, said an increase in demand and government cuts had left children’s services at “tipping point”.

Anntoinette Bramble, chair of the LGA’s children and young people board, said: “The fact that nine in 10 councils overspent their budgets on children’s social care in 2017-18 indicates the huge financial pressures councils all over the country are under to support vulnerable children and young people.”

The Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, said: “This hard-hitting report highlights the risks of continuing to starve children’s services of the vital funds they need to protect our most vulnerable children.

“We cannot just continue to cross our fingers and hope that vulnerable children will be alright and this report must be a final wake-up call to the Government.”

A Government spokeswoman said: “Every child deserves to grow up in a stable, loving family where they feel supported.

“We must help parents who face difficulties, to strengthen their family relationships so they can properly support their children.

“That is why we’re putting an extra £410m into social care this year, including children’s, alongside £84 million over the next five years to keep more children at home with their families safely, helping reduce the demand on services.”