Blackpool's blue flag looks safe as water quality on Fylde coast beaches gets seal of approval

Blackpool South beach has retained its 'excellent' water quality rating while all others on the Fylde coast were named 'good'
Blackpool South beach has retained its 'excellent' water quality rating while all others on the Fylde coast were named 'good'
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The sea off the Fylde coast is cleaner than ever, it has been revealed.

Bathing water standards continue to improve year on year and now every single Fylde coast beach is rated ‘good’ or better.

The latest classifications have the sea at Blackpool North improve from ‘sufficient’ to ‘good’, while Blackpool South, which has had blue flag status since 2016, retains its ‘excellent’ rating.

All other Fylde coast beaches remained ‘good’.

Neil Jack, chairman of the Turning Tides Partnership and chief executive of Blackpool Council said: “In Blackpool we’re immensely proud that our bathing waters continue to improve and delighted that any of the 18m visitors to Blackpool can safely swim and paddle.

“We’d like to thank everyone who has contributed towards making our seas cleaner.”

Hundreds of residents from across the North West have played their part in keeping beaches and seas clean, with over 8,000 hours of volunteering hours dedicated to the beach in 2016/17 on the Fylde coast alone.

Coun Fred Jackson, Blackpool Council’s cabinet member responsible for bathing waters, said: “I’m absolutely delighted at this year’s results, which means we should be able to retain the resort’s Blue Flag for a third year.

“We’d like to thank everyone who has helped to improve our water quality. Not only is it good for the town’s local economy but it also has big health and environmental benefits too.

“We’ll keep working to improve our environment and encourage everyone to do their bit – from picking up after your dog’s mess to not putting the wrong thing down the toilet, it all makes a difference.”

The latest ratings come as United Utilities continues to invest millions to improve the waste water infrastructure in the North West and prevent storm water spilling into bathing waters.