This is how Lancashire looked in 1985

A selection of your photographs from days gone by.

Wednesday, 14th July 2021, 4:34 pm
An afternoon of fun and music could mark the turning point for the residents of a strife-torn flats complex. Their summer festival may not have been as lavish or big as many Lancashire carnivals but in many ways it was more important. For the people who live in three high-rise blocks on Moor Lane, Preston, it was an important step towards creating community spirit in a place where it has been sadly lacking. Pictured: A group of lads calling themselves 'Level One' gave demonstrations of breakdancing
An afternoon of fun and music could mark the turning point for the residents of a strife-torn flats complex. Their summer festival may not have been as lavish or big as many Lancashire carnivals but in many ways it was more important. For the people who live in three high-rise blocks on Moor Lane, Preston, it was an important step towards creating community spirit in a place where it has been sadly lacking. Pictured: A group of lads calling themselves 'Level One' gave demonstrations of breakdancing

This week we are looking at 1985. Do you recognise yourself or anyone else in these pictures? Let us know. READ MORE: Stories that hit the headlines back in 1985.

Staff, pupils and parents at Kirkham County Primary School are celebrating the school's 75th anniversary by holding a special Edwardian week. The whole of school life has been projected back to the turn of the century for the class of 85. Throughout the week a variety of events has been arranged, including maypole dancing, and at playtime the children were shown how to play with these hoops

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Teenage athlete Mark Howarth received the shock of his life when he went to school. In front of all his friends during morning assembly at St Cuthbert Mayne High School, Preston, headmaster Joseph Connelly told him: "You're off to Spain in a couple of weeks." For Mark, 14, has been chosen to represent Great Britain in the International Federation of Catholic Schools Games in Caruna
An all-singing, dancing production of Oh! What a Lovely War has been a sell-out. For the musical play staged by Kirkham Grammar School has been a roaring success. The cast is clad in black and white costumes and the show includes songs, tap dances and a parasol dance. Pictured: Osman El-Jendi, Rebecca Simpson, Richard Wedge, Andrea Fish, David Wilson, Lorraine Anderson, Caroline Gault and Phillip Walmsley
Showbiz star Bonnie Langford gave youngsters an impromptu demonstration of her stage routine at a Lancashire school. Bonnie took time off from rehearsals for the Pirates of Penzance in Manchester to hand over the keys to a new minibus for the 58-pupil Coppice School, Bamber Bridge, Preston. While she was there she also presented swimming awards to the children and stayed for lunch
Preston North End's advance season ticket sales and Guild Club memberships were given a £6,300 boost through the overwhelming success of an "open night". More than 350 supporters turned out for the event. Our picture shows Simon Gibson, Dale Rudge, Promotion Girl Julie Peters and David Bradshaw, the North End commercial manager, chatting with some of the fans
If you went down to the school to play you'd sure get a big surprise. For every bear in Lostock Hall was gathered there together because it was the day the teddy bears had their picnic. Teddies, children and their mothers from the Ampleforth Play Group met at Lostock Hall Infant School on Avondale Drive for tea alfresco
Teacher Miss Margaret Shuttleworth has retired after 32 years in the classroom in the Preston area. Staff and pupils at Middleforth Primary in Penwortham, where she has spent the last 13 years, presented her with a clock radio, a necklace and a watch - so she can keep her eye on her newly found leisure time
Big Top performers pulled out all the stops for the most critical audience they will ever face - the Moscow State Circus. The Blackpool Tower Circus artistes were twice as nervous as usual as they took to the ring for the show and Grimble, the Tower's clown, was shaking in his over large shoes at the thought of meeting his idol Oleg Popov. The pair are pictured above (Grimble is on the left)
Sports promoter John Farrar organised a three-day cricket festival at Stanley Park which attracted nearly 50 world class stars and well over 7,000 spectators. The festival was the biggest event of its type held on the Fylde Coast for years, and the most ambitious of Farrar's projects so far. He is pictured above showing off his sporting prowess at the festival
Traders from all over the North West gathered to wake Preston up from its sleepy Tuesday blues. The town's covered market became the centre of attention for its first ever car boot sale - claimed to be one of the biggest in Europe. The idea for the sale - which attracted around 200 cars and stall holders - came from Coun Albert Richardson, Preston's chairman of environmental health
Amid all the glamour, fame and talent, Blackpool just would not be the same without the donkeys. Lucky the donkey backs up the fun for four-year-old Jennifer Frankland and her brother John, two. But the youngsters are no strangers to donkey rides. Their mum Eileen used to keep them as pets
Zany comedians Cannon and Ball agreed to be weighed by the Dutch Dairy Bureau in huge lumps of Gouda and Edam cheese. The usual arguments developed over who was the heaviest even before the weigh-in began. The giant scales tipped in Tommy's favour - he checked in at 14 Goudas and eight Edams (about 11st 6lbs) compared Bobby's 14 Goudas and five Edams. Pictured here: Bobby Ball is besieged by fans at the Hound Hill shopping plaza where the weigh-in took place
Father Francis may not find his way onto Top of the Pops. But the singing, guitar-strumming melodic monk is famous to thousands of needy people who have been helped by his non-stop charity work. This season he is "busking" in Blackpool for one day a week and collecting money for the blind. The remarkable 47-year-old is head of the Franciscan Friary in Clwyd, North Wales, where is also the parish priest. In between he has recorded 10 LPs - and all the money goes to charity
Play it again... summertime is here again and even if the weather isn't much to smile about, the playschemes are. Scores of schemes aim at keeping the children absorbed during the long school holidays are just starting to swing into action throughout Lancashire. Thousands of children are expected to attend - like this merry bunch pictured above at Tanterton Village Hall Playscheme
A whole village turned out to celebrate the diamond wedding of one of its best known couples. George and Hilda Dobson have lived in Wrea Green, near Kirkham, all their lives and are firm favourites among the villagers. The couple were married at St Annes RC Church at Westby and settled at Mill Lane. The couple have worked a farm most of their lives, following in the footsteps of George's father who started a farm at Bryning more than 90 years ago. They kept the farm going until their retirement