Glastonbury

The greatest and most controversial Glastonbury headliners

Glastonbury's greatest headlines have often brought controversy with them

Here we run down 10 of the famed festival's biggest and most controversial headliners.

Marc Bolan made an entrance at the first edition of Glastonbury with a storming set on the event's then much smaller main stage. He arrived in a Cadillac so large it barely fit down the property's narrow lane.

1. T Rex in 1970

Marc Bolan made an entrance at the first edition of Glastonbury with a storming set on the event's then much smaller main stage. He arrived in a Cadillac so large it barely fit down the property's narrow lane.
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When the Stone Roses were forced to pull out when guitarist John Squire broke his collarbone on a bike ride, Jarvis Cocker and his oddball crew were on hand to step in as Britpop's popularity peaked.

2. Pulp in 1995

When the Stone Roses were forced to pull out when guitarist John Squire broke his collarbone on a bike ride, Jarvis Cocker and his oddball crew were on hand to step in as Britpop's popularity peaked.
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Hot off the release of their revered third album OK Computer, the Oxfordshire band were in fine form as they took to the Pyramid Stage. Heavy rain blighted - or added drama to - their performance.

3. Radiohead in 1997

Hot off the release of their revered third album OK Computer, the Oxfordshire band were in fine form as they took to the Pyramid Stage. Heavy rain blighted - or added drama to - their performance.
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Bowie played at the second Glastonbury in 1971, and often recalled how he roused the audience with a late night rendition of Oh! You Pretty Things. He returned in 2000, this time as a bona fide rock star.

4. David Bowie in 2000

Bowie played at the second Glastonbury in 1971, and often recalled how he roused the audience with a late night rendition of Oh! You Pretty Things. He returned in 2000, this time as a bona fide rock star.
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