Resort artist’s poster to go under hammer

Kenneth Shoesmith's poster,  produced in 1936, is expected to fetch more than �1,000 at auction in New York
Kenneth Shoesmith's poster, produced in 1936, is expected to fetch more than �1,000 at auction in New York
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A rare 1930s railway poster by a Blackpool artist is set to fetch around more than £1,000 at auction in America.

The poster, which has the words ‘Lowestoft,It’s Quicker By Rail’, was designed by Kenneth Shoesmith for the London and North Eastern Railway in 1936 and it is now expected to sell for around £1,100 at Swann Galleries in New York on Wednesday.

He produced two posters for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) so this date also possibly confirms the time of his commission from the LNER

He produced dozens ofeye-catching posters which were used to help boost travel throughout the UK to beauty spots and seaside resorts.

Born in Halifax, West Yorkshire, in 1890, Mr Shoesmith was brought up in Blackpool in the early 20th century and lived in Imperial Terrace.

In 1909, he joined the Royal Mail Company.

Much of his art celebrated the ships of the Royal Mail Line, for which he produced a considerable number of paintings and sketches for advertising purposes.

From Blackpool, he went on to become a successful artist and was commissioned to produce murals for the interior of the Cunard White Star’s luxury ocean liner, the Queen Mary.

Tragically, Shoesmith was only 48 when he died on April,1939.

Shoesmith’s art was ‘exquisite’ – expert

Dr Richard Furness a British railway poster specialist and author of eight books on the subject, said: “Shoesmith is, in my opinion, very under-rated as a poster artist. His creations are all exquisite with a huge amount of artistic skill. I am a great admirer.

“He produced two posters for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) so this date also possibly confirms the time of his commission from the LNER.

“Although producing over twenty five railway posters,Shoesmith is better known as a marine artist.

“His shipping and travel posters command larger sums than those for his railway art.”