Fleetwood Town head coach Joey Barton: Time is of the essence for all managers

Fleetwood Town head coach Joey Barton
Fleetwood Town head coach Joey Barton
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Fleetwood Town head coach Joey Barton believes managers need time to be successful as they prepare for today’s game with Burton Albion.

His opposite number, Nigel Clough, has been assured of his place as manager for life, such is the feeling towards him from the club and the rise the Brewers have enjoyed under his stewardship.

Barton isn’t sure such a thing exists, although he sees the positives it would bring.

He said: “I’ve never had a job for life so I wouldn’t really be able to talk about that.

“Does that really exist? Does anyone really have a job for life?

“It’s usually got a few clauses in it, provided you don’t get pumped every week.

“It’s probably a nice position to be in, it gives a nice autonomy over the players because they know they’ve got to perform.

“Some players at certain clubs think they don’t really like the manager and will wait for the next one.

“That’s not right because you have a professional duty of care to be the best you can be every time you’re selected.

“Unfortunately that is an Alice in Wonderland theory that doesn’t exist in the real world.”

Barton is only in his second season at Highbury but has a close relationship with Town chairman Andy Pilley.

Barton believes a personal approach works best, whether that comes from the hierarchy or even from himself towards his players.

“Usually when a manager has a chairman’s backing and the support of the club, he does better than the job that could be done or is expected to be done,” Barton said.

“When a manager is unstable I do think it tends to lead to a negative period of the club.

“Every manager, no matter what you think, you need time; that is the most valuable quantity and commodity for a manager.

“It doesn’t matter how much you know until they know you care – and for people to learn how much you care about them takes time.

“It took me a season last year, for the group to learn and players that needed to, to leave.

“Players that didn’t quite fit into it needed to leave. But then the group you’re left with is a group that know how much you care and they’re all ears for any suggestions you have to make them perform better.

“If you get money it can make things happen quicker but time is the one thing all managers need.”