Exploring the history of Blackpool's Palatine Buildings, once home to The Palace nightclub

A prime corner site on Blackpool’s Central Promenade is undergoing a complete reconstruction to create the resort’s first five star hotel and a museum detailing Blackpool’s rich history

Friday, 14th June 2019, 1:32 pm
The prestigious Palatine Hotel was a familiar landmark on the promenade.

Nightclubs have featured prominently at the site with the Yellow Submarine operating in the basement of the building before being re-opened as Jellies in 1986.The Sub, as it was known, was operated as a fun pub and underwent major refurbishment to emerge as a new disco showbar. The name Jellies came from an Itma (It’s That Man Again) character Crystal Jellybottoms.After topping the night club scene for neary two decades, The Palace closed its doors in 2003, leaving the building disused until plans were announced in 2010 for the Sands Venue.The footbridge became a magnet for graffiti and was eventually closed to the public. It became an eyesore and was pulled down in 2009. Now it’s all change again and work is well underway for the new hotel and the museum which is set to open next year.

But its not the first time the site, where the former Sands Venue stood, has been redesigned.
The hotel stood there for nearly a century until bulldozers moved in to demolish it in the 1970s.

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Great aerial shot which shows work in progress to pull down the Palatine Hotel
All that remains - two of the hotel's pillars were the final parts top be pulled down
A footbridge was also built as part of the Palatine development. It spanned the promenade and was constructed to give safe access from the beach to the new development and across Bank Hey Street to the old C and A Store.
And from its ashes rose the more modest Palatine Building, which was most famously used for The Palace Nightclub.
The Palace was a huge success with a 3,000 capacity and the largest in the North West during the 90s. With the hefty price tage of 2.2m, the club opened in October 1986, with a star-studded line-up, including then Eastenders actor Leslie Grantham, who famously played Dirty Den.
It was thrust onto the world stage of nightclubs boasting state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems. After a revamp in 1994, the club even featured an art deco American fuel pump in the middle of the dining area.
After topping the night club scene for neary two decades, The Palace closed its doors in 2003. Other clubs sited in the basement of the building included Jellies. The closure of The Palace left the building disused until plans were announced in 2010 for the Sands Venue.
The familiar Sands Venue