Letters - September 22, 2014

Members of Save our Stanah are fighting proposals to build homes in the area.
Members of Save our Stanah are fighting proposals to build homes in the area.
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Have your say

Housing plan will lead to bottleneck

Bid for Stanah homes

Squeezed

The Gazette very kindly publicised the campaign by local residents opposing the development of, initially 165 and eventually 900 houses, at Stanah, Thornton (Gazette, September 18) .

According to national statistics the average family comprises 1.8 children .

It follows that 165 houses will generate 300 children initially and more than 1,600 when the rest of the development is finished . This in an area where schools are already being squeezed. On top of that, 44 per cent of those 165 houses will have two cars, while the remainder all have one car, giving a total of 160 additional cars all competing for space on our already congested roads.

When the development is complete there is likely to be an additional 650 cars.

Most of these cars will be making for the congested bottleneck at the River Wyre island causing headaches for residents and police. Add to this the additional vehicles from Bourne, Fleetwood and Norcross and we have a recipe for absolute chaos on our roads.

Who in their right mind would approve these 
developments?

D. Whitehead

Hornsea Close

Stanah

Cyclists are a menace

Injury fear

I am getting concerned about the abuse cyclists are up to riding on footpaths, especially teenagers who think they have a right to go fast down 
footpaths.

The trouble with this country is we wait for someone to get seriously injured before doing anything. The Promenade at Cleveleys, walking to Rossall, is an example.

I am on the Neighbourhood Watch and see it more and more in the area I live in.

I get concerned for elderly residents. People have more chance of being knocked over on the pavement, than they do while crossing the busy road.

Paul Smith

Anchorsholme

Park needs toilets

No facility

I have a seven-year-old grandson and two granddaughters, who are aged six and 11.

They love Stanley Park – the new duck boats, the skate park and the climbing activities on the adventure play park.

But after the commendations, here comes the 
complaint.

I have to ask: why are there no toilets?

When I was a child, born and bred here, the toilets were great.

They are now a police unit.

Why not reopen them and refurbish them and, if you make them units with a 20p entry charge, you will get the cost back.

Where do I take children who need the loo quickly?

The sports centre doesn’t keep wanting us in there, the arena is often shut and the nearest toilets then are in the cafe.

There is a building 
already there, near to the clock tower.

Replumb it, introduce a coin entry system and it will help everyone using the park including children, and those on the 
tennis courts, football turf and playing hockey matches.

R.Howarth

Boardman Avenue

Blackpool

Changed appearance

Soap plot

As the fire service has said, last week’s shocking scenes in EastEnders have been a reminder of the dangers of fire and why every home should have a smoke alarm.

But it also raises a wider 
issue.

This week’s episodes of 
EastEnders will see Kat Moon learning that she has sustained substantial scarring that will be with her for the rest of her life.

Many of your readers will 
relate to Kat’s horror at the news; in today’s image-obsessed society.

Having an unusual appearance is something that causes huge fear, and yet it’s something that more than a 
million people live with every day.

Contrary to what many 
assume, an unusual 
appearance need not be a barrier to a successful, fulfilling life.

At Changing Faces, we help tens of thousands of people every year through our advice and support services, and our ‘What Success Looks Like’ campaign celebrates the enormous contribution that everyone can make to society.

Through your letters page, I’d like to ask your readers not to feel sorry for Kat, but to hope that her character will get the help and support she needs to move on to rebuild a successful life.

Perhaps people could take time, too, to think about how they react to people with an unusual appearance.

We all believe in equality of sexuality, race equality, gender equality, but ask yourself the question: have you ever thought about ‘face equality’?

James Partridge

Chief Executive

Changing Faces

Need to support theatre

Little gem

I do hope people support the North Pier Theatre (Gazette September 19).

It would be such a shame to lose this little gem of a venue, but we all need to use it more.

C.Bolton

Marton