Letters - June 21

File photo dated 01/02/10 of author Sir Terry Pratchett. The BBC has defended its decision to film a man's last moments at the Dignitas clinic in a documentary fronted by Sir Terry Pratchett. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday June 7, 2011. In a five-minute sequence in the BBC2 programme, the best-selling author witnesses Peter, a British man in his early 70s who has motor neurone disease, taking his own life at the Swiss clinic. See PA story MEDIA Death. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire
File photo dated 01/02/10 of author Sir Terry Pratchett. The BBC has defended its decision to film a man's last moments at the Dignitas clinic in a documentary fronted by Sir Terry Pratchett. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday June 7, 2011. In a five-minute sequence in the BBC2 programme, the best-selling author witnesses Peter, a British man in his early 70s who has motor neurone disease, taking his own life at the Swiss clinic. See PA story MEDIA Death. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire
0
Have your say

THE BBC programme where we and Terry Pratchett, witnessed a 71-year-old man being assisted to die, in the Dignitas Clinic in Switzerland, was both thought-provoking and shocking (Gazette June 20).

Firstly, our life is not ours to destroy.

The life that we have is a gift from God, and it is a heinous crime against God, to destroy it in this way.

Were it to become law, the situation would also lend itself to the possibility of unscrupulous relatives, with an eye on the person’s legacy, pressurising their relative, for their own ends, to go down this road, instead of letting nature take its own course.

Yes – we are all afraid of death, as it is an unknown, but people of faith have a clear understanding that, when their time comes, they will be helped, both by the medical profession to ease their pain, and also by the comforting, loving arms of the Lord.

MRS J GEDDES

Whitemoss Avenue

Normoss

AFTER an unfortunate accident outside Fleetwood Market on June 9, where I tripped and fell flat on my face causing cuts and bruising and breaking my glasses in the process, I would like to thank the following people who came to my aid.

The lady from the curtain stall, who got the gentleman who took me to the staff cloakroom where he helped stem the bleeding from my nose and gave me tissues to clean the cuts on my face; the nurses at Fleetwood Hospital day health centre who patched me up, the man in the fish and chip shop who found the number of my optician so I could arrange an emergency appointment and last but not least Mr Geoffrey Robinson, the optician, who will make me up a new pair of spectacles as soon as possible.

Just prior to the accident my husband had gone to attend to another matter that took about five minutes. Without the help of all the people mentioned, who were kindness itself, what would have been a difficult day for my husband and myself turned out fine.

It has certainly restored our faith in human nature.

ANN PERRY

Bleasdale Avenue

Poulton

IF Blackpool Airport is an international airport, why can I not fly from Blackpool to my favourite Greek islands, such as Skiathos, Samos, Kavala, or Lesvos for my summer holidays?

Or any of the Greek islands come to that. And in the winter, why not Fuerteventura or Lanzarote?

And also why just the one airline, namely Jet 2?

It would be nice to see Monarch, Thomson, and indeed Thomas Cook all operating out of Blackpool.

So come on Blackpool International Airport. Get your act together.

IAN SANDHAM

Freckleton

AFTER an accident outside Fleetwood Market on June 9, where I tripped and fell flat on my face causing cuts and bruising and breaking my glasses, I would like to thank the following people who came to my aid.

The lady from the curtain stall, who got the gentleman who took me to the staff cloakroom where he helped stem the bleeding and gave me tissues to clean the cuts; the nurses at Fleetwood Hospital day health centre, the man in the fish and chip shop who found the number of my optician so I could arrange an emergency appointment, and Mr Geoffrey Robinson, the optician, who will make me up a new pair of spectacles as quickly as possible.

Just prior to the accident my husband had gone to attend to another matter that took about five minutes. Without the help of all the people mentioned, who were kindness itself, what would have been a difficult day for my husband and myself turned out fine.

It has certainly restored our faith in human nature.

ANN PERRY

Bleasdale Avenue

Poulton