Letters - June 14, 2017

BLACKPOOL 08-06-17
Michael Owen from Poulton-Le-Fylde, was injured by dogs while walking in Scorton early on in the year and still suffering six-months after the event.  The women responsible for the dogs ran off, but has since got in contact and sent him money and a card claiming she feels guilty, pictured with the card she sent.
BLACKPOOL 08-06-17 Michael Owen from Poulton-Le-Fylde, was injured by dogs while walking in Scorton early on in the year and still suffering six-months after the event. The women responsible for the dogs ran off, but has since got in contact and sent him money and a card claiming she feels guilty, pictured with the card she sent.
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DOG ATTACK

Penalties for attacks needs to be stiffened

Nothing is going to change when it comes to dangerous dogs until the penalties for attacks are made much stiffer - both for the dog and the owner.

Every week we hear about terrifying attacks by out-of-control dogs - frequently on defenceless young children - resulting with life changing and sometimes fatal results.

What these cases seem to have in common is the inability of the owner to control the dog, combined with the total disregard the owner has for the consequences.

At worst dog owners consider their pets to be equal to humans and would display a psychopathic disinterest in the suffering of their pets’ victims - famous dog lovers like Adolf Hitler and Ian Brady spring to mind.

I felt compelled to write after reading about the despicable attack on retired postman Michael Owen by a pack of three retrievers .

Reading the article it seems it will be just a matter of time before these animals attack and kill a child. The owner proved herself to be unbelievably reckless and irresponsible. The dogs which attacked Mr Owen should be tracked down and destroyed.

To just walk away from a wounded pensioner - seriously injured as a result of her idiotic incompetence as a dog handler - to protect her precious dogs from any repercussions, deserves an immediate custodial sentence and I urge the police to pursue this woman.

She is very lucky Mr Owen appears to be a forgiving man - but the law is still the law.

To attempt to buy someone off with an envelope of cash shows this woman is barely human herself.

Disgusting.

Mike Barker

South Shore

RESPONSE

Clearing up mystery of Debbie Atkinson

In response to the column in the Gazette on May 7 headlined ‘Sausage Rolls and Debbie Atkinson’ by Andy Mitchell of Radio Wave.

May I, through your paper, answer his question “I wonder where she is now?”

I am Deb’s father known as Arthur Acky and still reside in Norbeck. I love the area and remember the party ‘Jubilee Day’. My wife Brenda (now sadly passed away) with all the ladies of the street and his good self, organised it all. I got home from work and my tea was curly butties to dip in a bowl of soup. ‘Debbi’ is the middle of my three daughters – Carol Anne is the eldest and Francesca Louise is the youngest and now all of them live in the Layton area.

It’s good to know Andy had a ‘thing’ for my daughter!!

Arthur Atkinson

Norbreck

ELECTION

Brexit and election were big gambles

It’s been an unexpected and turbulent year in politics the world will not forget.

The referendum on leaving the EU was perhaps the biggest gamble the Conservatives have taken in modern history. The knock-on effect of Brexit, has created so much uncertainty, that in reality it’s going to cost the UK economy billions. It will also cost the government (regardless of who is in power) a great deal of precious time. Time and money that could be spent on NHS investment, and education.

While complex Brexit negotiations proceed, European leaders can also manipulate the unstable and fragmented state of UK politics. Was Theresa May brave to call a snap election seven weeks ago? Or was she complacent?

This was another classic and costly gamble.

During the 2017 election campaign Jeremy Corbyn received a lot of negative press. But he fought a fair political fight to become the next Prime Minister. Most importantly he connected with a lot of aspiring young people.

I admit Corbyn may have the image of the inoffensive helpful guy that works down at the local DIY shop, nonetheless he is a true stoic politician and this election has changed British politics. Since becoming the Labour leader in 2015 he was wholly underestimated by several members of his own party and the Tories. Theresa May v Jeremy Corbyn in this election reminds me of the children’s story ‘the hare and the tortoise’.

How many genuine Tory voters or MPs now feel comfortable with the idea of Theresa May teaming up with the DUP? Does Britain want a complex , and controversial arranged political marriage with the DUP? No thanks. Theresa May should drop the acts of political desperation and dutifully resign. Moving forward whoever is the leader of the Conservative party will have a serious challenge ahead and inherit a poisoned chalice .

Stephen Pierre

Blackpool

ELECTION

The majority of 
people back fracking

Last Thursday’s general election result may not have been the one the Conservatives were hoping for, but they still won the highest share of the popular vote and are all set to form the next Government.

They fought the election with a set of manifesto promises to boost fracking for shale gas. As it turns out, it looks like an even more sensible policy than ever in light of rising tensions in the Middle East that are now disrupting supplies of liquefied natural gas from Qatar, one of our main sources of gas imports - in the last week alone, two shipments have been diverted elsewhere and prices have spiked by over four per cent. In the area where Cuadrilla is exploring for shale gas, Conservative Mark Menzies was duly elected as Fylde MP for another term, polling an increased share of the vote to beat all the other candidates which were anti-fracking. Embarrassingly for her, the prominent Occupy activist and Green Party member, Tina Rothery, managed to somehow get less votes than her predecessor Bob Dennett did in 2015.

What this tells us is that the country and the Fylde have rejected the anti-fracking scaremongering and have backed the only political party with any clue about energy.

It’s time for anti-frackers everywhere to now accept that the majority of people either support or at least accept fracking as a means of improving energy security and keeping a lid on costs while creating jobs. Let’s have no more of this “We Said No” nonsense, shall we?

Brent Crossley

Via email