Letters - July 8, 2013

Pupils at Thames Primary School in South Shore have voted to have large No Smoking signs, similar to the council ones erected in parks, placed outside their school in a bid to reduce the habit amongst parents.'Members of the school council point out their message.  PIC BY ROB LOCK'1-7-2013
Pupils at Thames Primary School in South Shore have voted to have large No Smoking signs, similar to the council ones erected in parks, placed outside their school in a bid to reduce the habit amongst parents.'Members of the school council point out their message. PIC BY ROB LOCK'1-7-2013
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Have your say

No smoking notices

Too many

We should not be suprised that soon we will find the familiar, dictating no-smoking signs at the school gates (Gazette, July 2).

No smoking notices

Too many

We should not be suprised that soon we will find the familiar, dictating no-smoking signs at the school gates (Gazette, July 2).

Just like the signs which have gone up in the parks, these are ignoring most people’s opinions.

At the little park around the Solaris, there are no-smoking signs on top of each other.

Not one, but three, dictating a list of orders.

I am sure people can restrain from smoking for five minutes while they say goodbye to their children or pick them up.

Certainly there is no need for even more lecturing at the school gates by having even more signs go up.

And, legally the situation is not clear – after all this is out in the open air.

We should save the cost of the signs and spend the money on something more worthwhile.

C. Victor de Nagy

Gill Court

Blackpool

Vulnerable children

New law

On July 12, the UK Government has the chance to update an 80-year-old law to protect more vulnerable children.

The current, antiquated, law – the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 – only covers physical harm against a child.

It does not recognise emotional or psychological neglect, like ongoing humiliation, refusal to speak to a child or isolation or scapegoating, as a criminal offence.

As a mother, it’s hard to imagine anyone treating their own child this way.

Unfortunately, child neglect is the most common form of abuse in the UK – and it’s named as the most common reason for a child to be put on the Child Protection Register or to be made subject to a child protection plan in the UK.

This abuse is out there. And you can help stop it.

Children’s charity Action for Children has been working with MP Mark Williams to push forward a change to the criminal law on child neglect, which will see more children being protected from this abuse.

Now, for the first time, the Government can vote to change the law and we need the support of MPs in your area to make it happen.

By writing to your MP and asking them to vote for the change on July 12, you can help make a difference to a vulnerable child’s life.

I hope you will join me in emailing your MP from www.actionforchildren.org.uk.

Lesley Sharpe

Actress

Cats Paws open day

Thankyou

Cats Paws Sanctuary on School Road in Blackpool would like to thank everyone who came to our open day on June 23.

In spite of the awful weather we had a great day and enjoyed meeting all our supporters and lots of new friends as well.

We are very grateful for all the many items brought in prior to the open day.

They helped to make the day a very successful one.

Bobbie Hargreaves

Manager

Cats Paws

Marton

German u boat

Picked up

I was interested in your photograph in Lost Archives of the German U boat 1023, which visited Fleetwood, as I remember it well.

I was serving on HMS Amethyst, which took it into Weymouth.

When Germany surrendered in May 1945, all U boats were ordered to surface and fly a black flag and we picked up the first one.

We put a crew on board and escorted it into Weymouth, where cheering crowds lined the promenade.

Sadly, we weren’t able to join the celebrations ashore as we were sent straight out to take another into Plymouth.

Frank Lofthouse

Maycroft Avenue

Poulton

Guide Dogs for the Blind

My eyes

The Blackpool Gazette is extremely excellent to people like myself and certainly helps us in every possible way.

You certainly have people in our position very much at heart, and give us the great pleasure of knowing and understanding how much our guide dogs mean to us.

These wonderful animals and great friends make our lives so much better in every part of our daily lives.

It is marvelous to think we have such wonderful support from the many, many people who help in training these 
clever dogs.

They dedicate their lives to training them and then come to train people in our position.

My wonderful dogs have taken me all over Lancashire, Liverpool and the Lake District, and all around Garstang and many walks around the countryside.

When I first lost my sight at the age of five, the most frightening thing I had to overcome was travelling on trains.

After I was trained with my first guide dog, the fear disappeared as the dog was so well trained and stepped into the train making sure I would follow suit.

Since then, the fear has completely gone.

My dogs have been not only my eyes, but they are a most wonderful friend and companion in every sense of the word.

Mrs Alma Swarbrick

Thornton