Letters - January 11, 2016

First official truck of rubbish arrives at the new Thornton Waste Recovery Park. Pictured at the opening is (Lto R) deputy leader of Lancashire County Council County Coun Albert Atkinson, chief executive of Global Renewables Lancashire Ltd Martin Hopkins, chief executive of Lancashire County Council Ged Fitzgerald and the deputy leader of Blackpool Council.
First official truck of rubbish arrives at the new Thornton Waste Recovery Park. Pictured at the opening is (Lto R) deputy leader of Lancashire County Council County Coun Albert Atkinson, chief executive of Global Renewables Lancashire Ltd Martin Hopkins, chief executive of Lancashire County Council Ged Fitzgerald and the deputy leader of Blackpool Council.
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INVESTMENT

New venue would help boost old ones

In response to Christian Cox in the Your Say letter (Gazette, January 6), I would like to make the point that I most certainly agree that a new arena venue building in Blackpool would actually increase the popularity of the Winter Gardens and Grand Theatre, rather than compete against them as was thought by John Wright, to whom he was replying.

This is simply based on the fact that such a venue capability would pull in fans from across the country to see their favourite top stars bringing business revenue to hotels and smaller venues would increase trade because the Arena would have those fans stop over for these other venues in addition to the regular customers and in the mid to long-term, property prices would rise as well as the town getting revamped with more quality businesses.

There is no down-side!

Now, just how would Sainsbury’s by council offices do anything like that?

I have, for more than a decade, felt everything from disappointed to outright disgust with the way Blackpool’s future has been handled as regards its development and indeed in disillusionment have refrained from comment for more than two years, but I want to remind everyone that when the multi-acre brownfield site at top of town became available, all the development authorities could manage was to allow a Sainsbury supermarket and council offices which have a zero return as regards investment for the town. It’s just retrograde thinking and a complete waste as far benefit to Blackpool as a whole. Had we have had a Blackpool ‘Arena’ capable of taking top national and international entertainment stars, it would in a few short years, have returned Blackpool to part of the ‘circuit’ which it last enjoyed more than 40 years ago and not rely just on yesteryear ‘copy’ artists alone and saved Blackpool the huge embarrassment and shame for how managing to secure Elton John (still a big name) a while back then losing out to the weather midway in the performance.

So, my questions are, can Central Station play any effective part to realising this now, is the site large enough and will the authorities even consider it? Personally I think they won’t because those involved with decision making are the same authorities who have the ‘track record’ for blowing it too many times before. To them, I say, go on, give us a worthy reason to believe in and continue living in Blackpool. There has never been a greater need than now!

Chris Wiseman

South Shore

ENVIRONMENT

Waste park closure is a backward step

My brother-in-law works in recycling, and recently I heard about the impending part-closures of two of Lancashire County Council’s Waste Recovery Parks – Thornton and Farington.

As of May 2016, the waste from South Ribble, Preston, Chorley, Ribble Valley, Lancashire, West Lancashire, Blackpool, Fylde and Wyre will be going to landfill – that is adding over 300,000 tonnes of waste per year to landfill!

I am from Australia and we have many recycling, reducing and reusing methods used for waste, what’s happening here seems to me to be a backward step for the Lancashire area.

We went to the Blackpool Zoo the other day and the sea lion trainer was giving us all a lecture about creating a ‘greener’ environment – I wonder if he knows about the new landfill sites taking over the waste recovery parks?

These two waste recovery parks were opened in 2010 and cost £125m each, is this effective use of your tax pounds, to close them after six years of operation? I’ve heard cost-cutting in the council budget is the reason for the closures. If I lived in this area, I’d be pretty angry about the council’s decision to close a ‘green’ system for waste to go back to utilising landfill.

My brother-in-law and up to 300 other locals will also be looking for work this May.

What a shame.

Kim Seed

via email

POLITICS

Corbyn destined to fail with his doctrine

Corbyn’s attempt to fill his shadow cabinet with ‘yes’ men and women has proved excruciating and farcical, as well as disastrous for the Labour Party. Victory in 2020 is now a mirage.

Corbyn clearly believes that Parliament is an irrelevance. Like Momentum, his campaign arm, he abhors dissent (his own over 30 years apparently doesn’t count). He sees change coming from grassroot activists. Direct extra-parliamentary action is needed to bring about a socialist Garden of Eden. According to this view, hundreds of small protest movements will seize eventually power. It is an absurd, juvenile doctrine that will, like Corbyn, assuredly fail.

Dr Barry

Clayton

Cleveleys

PHASED OUT

Old Pacer trains best for disabled

There has been much rejoicing in the press about the phasing out of pacer trains.

True, their interiors have become ‘old hat’ and unattractive, but one set of passengers will be sorry to see them go.

People with mobility problems find them the easiest of all the trains to get on and (more particularly) to get off.

The most difficult trains in these parts are the Pendolinos.

It just goes to show that modern things don’t necessarily get everything right – nor are old things undesirable in every regard.

It would be good if an enterprising designer could specify attractive new trains which are also ‘easy­ access’.

Most of the bus manufacturers seem to have mastered it now.

Neil

Inkley

Address supplied