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Letters - April 03, 2018

Gulls are in the same category as the rats
Gulls are in the same category as the rats
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Gulls are in the same category as the rats

Pat O’Connor’s rather emotional letter about seagulls struck a nerve (Your Say, Gazette, March 28).

Ms O’Connor is right on a couple of points:

- They are not “to blame for unsociable behaviour”. They just cannot tell the difference between what we call “right and wrong”. They are hungry and are driven to survive any way they can.

- The amount of waste food we leave around and the stupid feeding of them, mainly by visitors, just makes things worse.

However, we could place rats into much the same category as Ms O’Connor places seagulls.

I have a few chickens, the food for which invariably attract rats.

I have shot and trapped several this year. I never get any criticism about that, but I dread to think what the ‘Bunny Huggers’ would say if I shot a few seagulls.

But then, rats do not have as good a PR agent as seagulls.

There is no denying that, love them or hate them, gulls are here to stay and are becoming an increasing problem which is going to have to be addressed sooner rather than later.

Not if, but when, a seagull pecks out a child’s eye, which they are quite capable of doing (they do it to sheep and lambs on a regular basis at lambing time) the whatsit will immediately hit the fan on a national level. When that happens, will Pat O’Connor still want to find a way to live with them??

Mike Mogilnicki

Westby

Animals

Why no inquiry at quail farm?

In reply to the report in the Gazette (March 21) regarding ‘Video leads to probe at quail farm. Can you please tell me why this Fayre Game Farm, Lodge Lane, Lytham was allowed to continue after allegations of animal cruelty was reported in 2007?

I am also very surprised the RSPCA has not been involved previously.

I also think the legislation regarding the welfare of these birds wants looking into.

Paul Jones

Anchorsholme

Information

It’s time for Julian to leave embassy

Julian Assange has had his Internet access cut off and the world knows about it, although obviously not from him.

He has made the use of the Internet his tool or weapon to spread information that others don’t want spread and this has made him a number of enemies but seemingly few friends.

There have been concerns that he may have endangered a number of people as well.

To most of us being offline, even for a few hours, is horrifying and we will miss the latest Twitter from some Twit or an Instagram photo. Our lives would lose meaning – well, actually it might gain some meaning.

Perhaps the Ecuadorian embassy should allow him incoming messages only. He has confronted a number of issues and maybe carried the torch of truth, but it is time for him to come out and sort out his own life first.

Dennis Fitzgerald

via email

Council

They’re trying to claw back the cash

I have, this past week, received my 2018 council tax demand.

Last year’s charge for band B was £914.38, plus three per cent (£27.81).

This year it equals £942.19.

Last year’s adult social care was £35.86 plus three per cent (£1.87).

This year it equals £37.73, not £64.36, as Lancashire County Council (LCC) is charging.

What they appear to have done is added last year’s LCC and social care charge together then, once again, added three per cent, thereby charging us TWICE for the LCC increase.

What the amount comes to, if they have done this with every household, I have no idea, but it will not take them long to make up the millions they claim to have as a shortage.

Name and address supplied

Easter

Sort out transport for bank holidays

Like many people, I suspect, I stayed at home over the Easter break – not because I wanted to, particularly, but because I was put off by the prospect of spending hours in a car, stuck in jams on the M55 and other motorways.

The number of cars on our roads – together with the awful public transport over bank holidays – means a staycation is forced upon us.

If they want us to get out and spend our money, the powers-that-be have to make transport a priority.

Phil Laurence

via email