The new Broughton Bypass - in numbers

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The long-awaited Broughton Bypass opens today, and the construction details make some impressive reading.

Preston's newest road was today officially opened as James Towers Way, named after a local war hero.

James Towers Way is ready for opening

James Towers Way is ready for opening

Take a look back on the long journey to get this new relief road.

The construction effort has been impressive; a huge undertaking which has seen 36,700 square metres of carriageway laid to relieve 90% of Broughton Village traffic from the A6.

Noise considerations have been addressed, with 1,016m of sound barriers, and even the humble newt has been looked after with 1.5km of permanent amphibian fencing.

Talking of nature, seven new ponds have been created for wildlife habitats, while more that 100 new trees have been planted in the immediate area.

The new road includes 1,016m of sound barriers

The new road includes 1,016m of sound barriers

Other road facts include:

• 5,700 square metres of footway surfacing

• 5,500m of stockproof fencing

• 6,700m of drains, 9,300m of kerbing and 1,860m of edgings

More than 22,000 vehicles which previously travelled along the A6 through Broughton every day will now use the new road, relieving many commuter headaches.

Broughton Bypass timeline

1970-76

Concerns first raised about increasing congestion in Broughton village.

1986

Campaign to build a bypass to take traffic around the village is launched.

1991

Public consultation begins on two proposed routes for a bypass. Route B, roughly today’s layout, is chosen.

1997

An air quality and noise assessment indentifies problems around Broughton.

2001

LCC give planning green light to a revised bypass scheme.

2012

Pollution results in parts of the A6 lead to Broughton being designated an Air Quality Management Area.

2013

Scheme wins City Deal funding and is given priority.

2014

Scheme gets Growth Fund allocation.

2015

April - six day public inquiry.

July - Go-ahead from government.

December - Hochtief (UK) Ltd win contract.

2016

January - work begins with spring 2017 end date proposed.

September - end date revised to August 2017.

2017

July - new delays push opening back to early 2018.

September - opening brought forward to today.