This is when the heatwave is set to return to Lancashire

Temperatures are now on the rise again with the heatwave set to return to England, as the country returns to more humid, muggy weather in the run-up to the last Bank Holiday weekend of the year
Temperatures are now on the rise again with the heatwave set to return to England, as the country returns to more humid, muggy weather in the run-up to the last Bank Holiday weekend of the year
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The weather has taken a dip lately, with cooler temperatures and wet and windy weather conditions, especially due to Storm Ernesto last week.

However, temperatures are now on the rise again with the heatwave set to return to England, as the country returns to more humid, muggy weather in the run-up to the last Bank Holiday weekend of the year.

According to the Met Office, drier, warmer weather is set to become more widely established into early September.

According to the Met Office, drier, warmer weather is set to become more widely established into early September.

Some central and northern areas will see spots of rain but according to the Met Office these will not be “long-lived or heavy”.

Warm and humid air is set to linger for the first half of this week, with mainly dry weather for most around the country.

Although some rain is expected on Thursday, the Bank Holiday weekend in general looks relatively warm around the country.

The South will be mainly dry, with the North still seeing good sunny spells, although a little less settled.

Although Lancashire will see peak temperatures of around 17C this weekend, the beginning of September is then set to see temperatures climb in the region.

Return of the heatwave

According to the Met Office, drier, warmer weather is set to become more widely established into early September.

It looks likely that the weather pattern will change during the beginning of September, with more areas of high pressure. This will therefore bring associated settled and warmer weather which will increasingly dominate.

This will bring longer dry spells, particularly for northwestern areas compared to much of August.

However, there are also likely to be some more changeable weather at times in the north and northwest, with these conditions perhaps extending southeastwards at times.

Temperatures by day are likely to be generally warmer than average, especially for the southeastern half of the UK.

Hottest summer ever?

The UK could be about to record its hottest summer ever, surpassing the legendary heatwave of 1976.

The Met Office have just released interim figures which suggest that the summer of 2018, including the months of June, July and August, will enter the record books.

If the UK now continues at the same rate as 2006, with temperatures of around 15.8C (60F), a new record will be established.