Patients put first on pathways to success

Back row, from left: Vajay Kamath, Michael Bryant, Arshad Javed and Jan Tipping. Front: Gabby Webster, Natalie Davidson and Louise Thompson.
Back row, from left: Vajay Kamath, Michael Bryant, Arshad Javed and Jan Tipping. Front: Gabby Webster, Natalie Davidson and Louise Thompson.
0
Have your say

PATIENTS across the Fylde coast are to be given clearer information about how and when they will be seen by doctors as part of a major new campaign to improve the standard of treatment and care across the area.

More than 100 medical experts are drawing up a new strategy on how patient care should be dealt with.

Health chiefs say it should also mean patients are seen quickly.

In addition, appointments are less likely to be cancelled or re-arranged.

Clinicians from Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust joined GPs, community nurses and specialist nurses at Blackpool FC’s stadium conference suite to design and launch 48 patient ‘pathways’ – the journey a patient takes through the treatment process – in areas such as general surgery, gynaecology, ear, nose and throat, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, urology and cardiac surgery.

Bosses say it will mean patients get a standardised and improved quality of care for the generally common conditions seen both within doctor’s surgeries and the hospital.

The aim is to give patients a better overall experience of health care including clearer, less confusing information from the trust about when and how they will be seen.

This should mean more information for patients on their planned care therefore appointments are less likely to be cancelled or rearranged which will also help patients plan their care around other commitments, health bosses claim.

Blackpool Teaching Hospitals’ deputy director of operations for scheduled care, Andrew Kent, said: “We aim to standardise and improve treatments and quality of care.

“The trust has been working closely with our local health partners to implement pathways of care that cover the entire patient journey.

“We have written a pathway for each common condition or procedure across the whole health spectrum in order to reduce variation in care and ensure the patient is at the centre of everything we do and ensure that best practice is followed.

“Studies have proved that clinical pathways reduce the length of stay, reduce the likelihood of in-hospital complications within both the acute hospital and community care.”

These new pathways aim to ensure patients referred for planned care are seen quickly, in the right place and by the right clinician.

The local health services have set a target of 100 days for these pathways to become implemented.

They will become operational on July 2.

Follow us on twitter @The_Gazette and like our page on facebook to keep up with all the latest news.