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In the Navy – and in pictures, a glimpse inside HMS Inskip

Civic visit to HMS Inskip, in 1976
Civic visit to HMS Inskip, in 1976

The four large masts standing 600ft tall – glowing with safety lights on the top as a warning to all low-flying aircraft – are all that’s left of HMS Inskip, which used to be known as HMS Nightjar.

Our archive photos provide a rare glimpse inside the site, which was operated by the Royal Navy until 2003. It housed an airfield of the Fleet Air Arm and later became a military high frequency radio transmitting station.

Radio mechanic Harry Harrison checks one of the transmitters with petty officer Norman Marshall, April 1970

Radio mechanic Harry Harrison checks one of the transmitters with petty officer Norman Marshall, April 1970

It also spent some time as a training centre for Sea Cadets.

Our pictures show HMS Inskip back in its heyday of the 1970s.

Naval wireless technicians at work in the control centre of the Royal Navy wireless transmitting station HMS Inskip, in March 1975

Naval wireless technicians at work in the control centre of the Royal Navy wireless transmitting station HMS Inskip, in March 1975

Lieutenant commander Syd Wakeham, commanding officer of HMS Inskip, does his morning rounds of the Navy's premier wireless transmitting station, in 1975

Lieutenant commander Syd Wakeham, commanding officer of HMS Inskip, does his morning rounds of the Navy's premier wireless transmitting station, in 1975

Royal Navy HMS Inskip, December 1993

Royal Navy HMS Inskip, December 1993

HMS Inskip Royal Navy'December 1993

HMS Inskip Royal Navy'December 1993