Energy plant for fish park changes plan

Artist's impression of Fleetwood's forthcoming fish park.
Artist's impression of Fleetwood's forthcoming fish park.
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Plans for a renewable energy plant which will power Fleetwood’s forthcoming £20m fish park have been re-submitted to Wyre Council.

The plant, which will use modern methods to create heat energy from the processing of cardboard, wood and paper, will provide the electricity for refrigeration system at the fish park.

The visitors' centre being planned by Reform Energy in connection with their energy recapture plant at Fleetwood.
artist's impression

The visitors' centre being planned by Reform Energy in connection with their energy recapture plant at Fleetwood. artist's impression

Plans for the plant were originally given the green light by Wyre in 2011 but operator Reform Energy says new technology, developed in the last four years, mean minor changes to the original plans will have to be considered by planners or officers.

The plant and the neighbouring fish park, both to be overseen by Reform, are being sited on a large area of land between Windward Avenue, close to the Harbour Village estate, and Jameson Road.

Chris Nelson, communications officer for Reform Energy, said: “We expect our new plans, with just minor alterations, to go before the council in June or possibly July but we don’t expect this to delay the fish park.”

The fish park itself will see fish merchants and processors move to the new premises from their current buildings, some of which are in a dilapidated state. The fish park was overwhelmingly approved by Wyre planners in December last year and it is hoped the facility can be up and running by early 2018.

Artist's impression of Fleetwood's forthcoming fish park.

Artist's impression of Fleetwood's forthcoming fish park.

Some fish merchants are highly supportive of the plans and say it will boost trade and may lead to extra jobs.

But there is also concern that higher rents at the new premises could squeeze profits. Many of the funds to pay for the fish park are coming from investment groups who expect to turn a long-term profit for the enterprise.

The fish park, hailed by some as the North’s equivalent of London’s famous Billingsgate Fish Market, was kick-started in February last year by a £2.5m regional growth grant from the Government, with former Fleetwood MP Eric Ollerenshaw a key supporter of the initiative.

Manchester-based Reform Energy states that its aims are to produce clean energy while reducing the need for landfill sites.