Disaster at the Promenade

As well as being a magnet for the good times, Lancashire’s piers have also attracted more than their fair share of disasters.

Thursday, 21st March 2019, 2:25 pm
Updated Thursday, 21st March 2019, 2:33 pm
Blackpool North Pier's Indian Pavilion was destroyed by fire on September 11, 1921, from Lancashires Seaside Piers by Martin Easdown

Over the past century almost all of the county’s pleasure piers – both still in existence and long gone – have suffered devastating accidents of one form or another.From fires to storms to maritime accidents these most iconic of seaside landmarks have made the headlines in dramatic circumstances. The images published here capture just a handful of the disasters to hit the county’s piers in the early 20th century. All feature in a book charting the life and times of the Lancashire pier. Lancashire’s Seaside Piers by Martin Easdown is available from Wharncliffe Books imprint published by Pen and Sword priced £12.99.

Lytham Pier after it was cut in two by barges October 6, 1903 (the pier was eventually demolished in 1960), from Lancashires Seaside Piers by Martin Easdown
Morecambe's Central Pier's 'Taj Mahal' Pavilion wasdestroyed by fire on July 31, 1933 (the pier was eventually demolished in 1992) from Lancashires Seaside Piers by Martin Easdown

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Morecambe's Central Pier's 'Taj Mahal' Pavilion wasdestroyed by fire on July 31, 1933 (the pier was eventually demolished in 1992) from Lancashires Seaside Piers by Martin Easdown
Morecambe West End Pier was damaged by storm on February 27, 1903 (the pier was eventually demolished in 1978) from Lancashires Seaside Piers by Martin Easdown