Blackpool: From the courts 03-11-17

Blackpool magistrates court
Blackpool magistrates court

Here is the latest round-up of some of the cases at Blackpool Magistrates Court.

Here is Thursday’s round-up of cases at Blackpool Magistrates Court 02-11-17


Clive Harris, 18, fraud

A teenager brought up mainly in care from a young age smoked cannabis from the age of nine a court was told.

Clive Harris was described as “an angry young man” who had previous convictions for violence against care staff and fellow care home residents.

In a report to the court, probation officer Lesley Whittaker, told magistrates she had had to end her interview with Harris when he became angry after saying he would not commit a year of his life to the probation service or keep an overnight curfew as he frequently went out at night to the beach to collect his thoughts.

Harris, an 18-year-old former barman, of Bolton Street, South Shore, pleaded guilty to seven offences of fraud.

He was sentenced to a 12 months community order with up to 20 days rehabilitation to be supervised by the probation service, ordered to do 50 hours unpaid work for the community and told to pay £85 costs plus £85 victims’ surcharge.

Prosecutor, Martine Connah, said a woman parked and locked her car outside her home on September 11 at 10pm.

The following morning she saw her contact-less bank card had been taken from the car.

Police inquiries revealed Harris had used the card a total of seven times at McDonalds and two service station shops, spending £84 on food, cigarette and items he said he needed for his home.

Gerry Coyle, defending, said at the time of the offences Harris, who was brought in care from a young age, was suffering from serious health issues after his best friend died in his arms of an overdose.

Harris had also lost his job, had no money and had not eaten for two days. He found the card in the street near McDonalds and decided to see if it worked.

In a report to the court, probation officer Lesley Whittaker, said Harris had told her he had started using cannabis at the age of nine but had stopped using it some months ago.

Ryan Calvert, 24,drug-driving, no insurance and not in accordance with his provisional licence

A father-to-be was found with drugs in his body after police stopped him for speeding.

Ryan Calvert, 24, of Avondale Crescent, South Shore, pleaded guilty to two offences of drug driving, having no insurance and driving not in accordance with his provisional licence.

He was banned from the road for 12 months, fined £240 with £85 costs and ordered to pay £30 victims’ surcharge.

Prosecutor, Martine Connah, said a police patrol saw Calvert speeding in an Audi A3 on Endsleigh Gardens, on August 22 in the early hours.

At first Calvert lied and provided false details, but police found his learner’s licence in his possession.

A blood test showed 65 units of cocaine in his body - the limit is 10 and 547 units of Benzolecgonine (a derivative of cocaine) the legal limit of which is 50.

Brett Chappell, defending, told magistrates that Calvert was on licence from prison and had put his liberty in jeopardy. His partner was expecting their first child.

Calvert had not taken cocaine on the day of the offence but some days previously and had not realised the drug could stay in a person’s bloodstream for many days.

Paul Fitton, 36, theft

A father stole because he had no money and he was seeing his young daughter for the first time in years.

Paul Fitton was having the nine-year-old overnight and reverted to crime to provide food and electric so his daughter would be comfortable at his home.

Fitton, 36, of Clinton Avenue, Blackpool, pleaded guilty to two offences of theft.

He was sentenced to 10 weeks imprisonment suspended for 12 months and ordered to pay £115 victims’ surcharge.

Prosecutor, Martine Connah, said Fitton was detained after dropping chocolate bars in Blackpool town centre on October 13 at 1.50pm.

He was found to have stolen £36 of chocolate from Poundland and razor blades valued at £50 from Boots.

At the time of the offences he was on two conditional discharges and a community order for shoplifting.

Brett Chappell, defending, said Fitton’s life had previously been devastated by an addiction to alcohol but he was now on a rehabilitation course and had dropped from drinking nine litres of cider a day to one or two cans of lager.

The day after the offences he was due to see his young daughter for the first time in years and she was to stay over at his home.

He went to the post office to collect his benefit money but found his claim had been changed and the money would not be there for a week.