Blackpool air museum team land their first flying wartime aircraft

The Piper Cub which has been acquired by the aviation museum team at Hangar 42 in Blackpool Airport
The Piper Cub which has been acquired by the aviation museum team at Hangar 42 in Blackpool Airport

Blackpool’s aviation museum has taken delivery of an air-worthy Second World War aircraft.

The team from Hangar 42 have acquired an original 1943 Piper Cub, a type which would have been regularly seen in the skies above the Fylde Coast during the war.

A Piper Cub with the USAAF at Warton during the Second World War

A Piper Cub with the USAAF at Warton during the Second World War

The light aircraft was extensively used in trainer and reconnaissance roles particularly by the US which had a major air base at Warton.

The Hangar 42 aircraft is painted in the US Army Air Force livery and the team hopes to be able to offer flights to visitors in the future.

John Coombes from the Lytham St Annes Spitfire Ground Display team which is behind the growing museum project said it was an exciting development for the whole team.

He said: “The Piper Cub in its USAAF markings would have been a regular sight over the Fylde Coast whilst undertaking operational flights from the USAAF BAD-2 base at Warton.

“This is our first venture into airworthy exhibits to sit alongside our Spitfires.

“We are now looking to further expand our skills as a volunteer team to enable us to hopefully have an airworthy Second World War fighter plane in our stable in the coming years.”

He said they need general volunteers to help out at the Squires Gate museum but also volunteers with mechanical and engineering skills as well as IT and joinery backgrounds.

Matt Whittle said: “The aircraft arrived in crates in the UK at Avonmouth docks.

“There, along with fuel supplies, the crates of sub-assemblies were sent by train to Saltcotes railhead a short distance from BAD-2.

“The aircraft were built and stored in a number of hangars, all of which are still standing today at Warton aerodrome.”