£91k Blackpool youth centre investment to transform lives

Former Magic club being converted into a youth centre for the Claremont area.  Pictured is Coun Lynn Williams.
Former Magic club being converted into a youth centre for the Claremont area. Pictured is Coun Lynn Williams.
0
Have your say

A £91,000 investment in a new youth centre is set to help transform lives in a Blackpool neighbourhood ranked as one of the most deprived in England.

Community leaders hope the Magic Club in Claremont will open in January as a hub for young people.

Former Magic club being converted into a youth centre for the Claremont area

Former Magic club being converted into a youth centre for the Claremont area

Work has been going on for the last few months to refurbish premises at the back of Sherbourne Road, formerly used as a magicians club.

Claremont councillor Lynn Williams said: “We wanted to be right in the heart of the community and felt this was the perfect venue.

“It is desperately needed because parts of this ward rank among the most deprived in the country.

“We have children living in poverty and not only do they need somewhere to go where they can enjoy themselves, but also a safe space to go.”

Water company United Utilities has provided the £91,000 funding after a bid supported by Blackpool North MP Paul Maynard.

Work has included installing a kitchen and new toilets, removing partitions and seating and putting in a new floor.

Three youth workers have already been recruited and are working in the neighbourhood.

Once open, it is proposed to run sessions including a youth club and a healthy eating programme.

The youth club will be run by EPS, a Fylde-based social enterprise which already runs youth services including the Boys and Girls Club in Mereside.

Director Jed Sullivan said: “Our sessions are already making a massive impact on Mereside.”

In the last set of government deprivation rankings, published in 2015, the Cocker Street area of Claremont was ranked the third most deprived area in England.

The statistics measure employment, barriers to housing, health, crime and income levels.