New £500k scanner to slash breast cancer service delays at Blackpool Victoria Hospital

Breast cancer services on the Fylde coast are in line for £900,000 of additional cash.

Monday, 1st April 2019, 9:04 am
Updated Monday, 1st April 2019, 9:09 am
The machine will cost 500,000, Vic bosses say

Hospital chiefs hope to spend £500,000 on expanding the Breast Care service including by providing a second mammography and ultrasound machine, while there will also be annual running costs of around £400,000.

It comes after recent criticism of the service when figures showed only 25 per cent of patients referred from their GP with breast cancer symptoms were seen within the required time of two weeks.

The NHS says 92 per cent of patients are now being seen within three weeks.

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The machine will cost 500,000, Vic bosses say

Janet Barnsley, interim director of operations - planned care, at Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “The Breast Care service across the Fylde coast has been identified as a priority, and although improvements have been made with latest figures showing 92 per cent of patients being seen within three weeks, we have developed an extensive business case to develop the service further.

“The business case includes £500,000 for an expansion to the service to provide a second mammography and ultrasound machine and estate adjustments.

“Although the business case is yet to be approved, all members of the Fylde coast health economy have been conscious of the performance for breast cancer referrals and are committed to supporting the cancer agenda going forward and providing the best care possible for our patients.”

The bid for extra cash is despite the Trust having to make savings of £17.5m in the coming year. Last December figures from the Blackpool Clinical Commissioning Group’s mid-year performance report showed only 25 per cent of patients referred from their GP with breast cancer symptoms were seen within the required time of two weeks compared to the target of 93 per cent.