Union members at Blackpool Sixth college will go on strike on Wednesday

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Union members at Blackpool Sixth college will be going on strike on Wednesday to demand more funding for their students and the college.

The action is part of a national strike by the National Education Union (NEU) over a £700 million shortfall in funding for Post 16 education. There will be union members from 34 sixth form colleges across the country taking part .

Blackpool Sixth Form college

Blackpool Sixth Form college

A spokesman for the NEU said: “The NEU members will be taking action to secure the funding needed to reverse job losses, class size increases, and cuts to teaching time and curriculum provision.

“They also want to sustain fair pay and their conditions and employment.”

Around 50 members from the Blackpool Old Road college are expected to take part in the action according to the NEU but the school has said it will remain open.

A picket line outside the school is also expected on the day by the members.

A spokesman from the college said: "We are aware that on Wednesday, November 20 the National Education Union is planning strike action in a number of sixth form colleges across the country.

"Union representatives have made it clear that the dispute is about government funding to the sixth form college sector and is in no respect a dispute with the management of Blackpool Sixth.

"We will not know the scale of the action until Wednesday morning, so we are opening the college as normal. Students should attend at the usual time for their lessons."

Kevin Courtney, Joint General Secretary of the National Education Union, said:

“NEU members in sixth form colleges have a very clear message for Government, and their anger is growing.

“Each day they see the effects of shameful cuts to 16-19 funding, which have gone on much longer and much deeper than in any other school sector.

“In this election we are arguing the case for education. With today’s strike, members are amplifying that message.

“They are telling Government and the general public that Sixth Form Colleges are on their knees. Serious investment is needed urgently to ensure that it can remain the ‘jewel in the crown’ of the education sector. Meeting the £700m shortfall for Post-16 would be a good start.