Blackpool’s very own CSI teams

The team at Spotless cleaning, in South Shore, specialise in tidying up crime scenes after the police leave. Office manager Emily Cook with directors Tom Swire (left) and Chris Days. Below: Clearing up a heroin addict's home.
The team at Spotless cleaning, in South Shore, specialise in tidying up crime scenes after the police leave. Office manager Emily Cook with directors Tom Swire (left) and Chris Days. Below: Clearing up a heroin addict's home.
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Television audiences have always had a morbid fascination with crime scenes – as proved by the popularity of the hit CSI TV series.

Various spin-offs have seen viewers getting a glamourised look at the work of detectives in Las Vegas, Miami and New York...but what about Blackpool?

The team clearing up a heroin addict's home once police had finished investigating.

The team clearing up a heroin addict's home once police had finished investigating.

Meet Spotless Cleaning, the resort’s real life crime scene clean-up team.

For years, audiences have been tuning in to watch episodes centred around the work of forensic experts in some of America’s biggest cities, but the truth is this kind of work carried out by police forces everywhere.

It may not always be pleasant but once the investigators have moved out, someone has to help clear up.

And Spotless Cleaning, on Lytham Road, is one of few businesses in Lancashire that is qualified to take over once the police tape has been lifted.

Tom Swire, one of the company’s directors, has spoken of the insight he gets into how Blackpool’s own crime scene investigators operate.

But the work shows the kind of situations police officers deal with on a regular basis.

And the cleaners have found their new line of work an intriguing glimpse into the life of the real-life crime scene investigators.

He said: “It’s like what you see on television and worse.

“What you don’t get on television is the smell.

“It can be unpleasant but the work is interesting.

“Every day you go into something different.”

The varied nature of the job means one day the team can be called to help move a body and the next they are clearing out a drug den.

Mr Swire said: “One job recently was a heroin addict in Blackpool.

“When we got there we found 120 used syringe needles.”

It is not work for the faint-hearted and gives an insight into the grittier side of the resort – but the team has to stay professional when they go about their work.

Mr Swire said: “We have also had to deal with a decomposed body.”

Because so few companies are accredited to work on crime scenes, the company is getting plenty of work.

Recently staff were called out to Barrow, in Cumbria, to help police with a dead body that had been found.

The company became accredited by the National Academy of Crime Scene Cleaners back in May.

Mr Swire said it had helped them to expand the business by branching out into new areas.

He said: “We have grown the business quite considerably in recent months.”

Mr Swire runs the company with its founder, Chris Days, who set up the business in 2010.

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