REVIEW: Rocking around the clock as Tenors thrill

Tenors Of Rock, play the Pavilion Stage (Lowther Pavilion) at Lytham Festival, featuring Jaymz Denning from Blackpool, centre. Picture: Bradley Hamer
Tenors Of Rock, play the Pavilion Stage (Lowther Pavilion) at Lytham Festival, featuring Jaymz Denning from Blackpool, centre. Picture: Bradley Hamer
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I echo Nicole Sherzinger’s sentiments entirely - though The X Factor judge’s words, cried when Tenors Of Rock auditioned two years ago, aren’t family newspaper friendly...

So let’s just say I love men who sing their hearts out - as Tenors Of Rock truly do.

The five-piece barely came up for air as they roared through Sweet Child Of Mine, Love In An Elevator, Play That Funky Music, and Living On A Prayer to open their show.

The group comprises some of the very best voices and performers from the West End - including one of the longest serving Jean Valjean’s from Les Mis, no less - to change the face (and sound) of male groups.

Blackpool’s own Jaymz Denning offered genuine thanks to festival organisers Cuffe and Taylor for giving the Tenors a second opportunity to play on (or at least close to) his home turf, after an acclaimed stint ahead of Michael Ball at 2014’s Lytham Proms.

He kept women of a certain age on the edge of their seats, wearing his trademark kilt, and Jaymz and Gareth Richards had the capacity audience eating out the palm of their hands with chat.

The Tenors have used their stage skills to carve out a show in which they perform a range of songs that take you on a rollercoaster ride of emotions.

To move seamlessly from a stunning a capella version of Phantom Of The Opera’s Music Of The Night, followed by Pavarotti’s Nessun Dorma and straight into a rip-roaring Queen medley takes some skill. Their version of Brothers In Arms, by Dire Straits - recently rereleased to raise money for the family of the late rugby player Danny Jones - had your hairs standing on end.

While the closing British rock medley had the crowd finally standing and dancing the night away.

Tenors Of Rock’s only regret of the night could be that they weren’t taking to the stage with the name Tongue Of Fire, an inspired moniker for a troupe of pint-sized performers from Poulton-based music school Up Beat Rock Academy.

Academy boss Ian Hooper (of Hooper Band fame) showcased the youngsters from his school as well as the choir from festival sponsors Danbro Accountancy, as two rousing support acts ahead of the main event - leaving the crowd nicely warmed up, to make them perfect putty in the hands of the Tenors Of Rock.

Katie Upton