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Bringing dreams to life

RealtimeUks graphics for the Rome Total War 2 game and (below) Tony Prosser.

RealtimeUks graphics for the Rome Total War 2 game and (below) Tony Prosser.

  • by Tim Gavell
 

A COMPANY built on illusions and fantasy is building a prosperous reality fulfilling people’s dreams.

Computer graphics specialist RealtimeUK may be based in a village farm but it has a growing international reputation for being able to realise the dreams of advert film makers and computer games companies.

The Westby firm uses computer graphics to create 3D art, adverts and films for big name clients.

It took on seven new artists just before Christmas and is lining up three more at the start of a year which its boss says will be the biggest and best in its 16-year history.

Now it has a staff of 32, which is not bad for a company founded by MD Tony Prosser, in his bedroom in Lytham after leaving what is now Blackpool and The Fylde College. The films RealtimeUk has produced for the Rome Total War 2 game, due out in October, could easily be mistaken for a Hollywood trailer and the firm has also made short videos for World of Tanks and Kinect Disneyland Adventures.

The studio also does 3D graphics work for Bet365’s TV ads featuring Ray Winstone and premier British sports car firm Aston Martin, including part of their website where prospective buyers can click on a 3D car and configure it exactly how they want it.

Tony said, in a way their business was “all smoke and mirrors” but the reality is that the business is on the up.

He added: “Video games makers have not got the time to produce promotional films for their new games, so they come to studios like ours.

“We also create bespoke adverts for the automotive industry. The adverts you see in a car showroom or a launch are not photographs, they are CGI.”

He said there was a cost saving for the clients as well as them having access to his artist’s expertise.

Tony added: “The video game connection began about 12 years ago. We were doing CGI marketing films for the defence industry – battle scenes. We showed some of the work at a games industry show and we kept being asked, ‘Wow what game is that from?’”

He said they now liaise with the game makers to produce promotional films which tie in perfectly to the what is seen on screen using the same colour palettes and characters long before the games are even finished.

Now with the rise of free to play games on phones and tablets more work is coming their way as the studios which produce them seek to keep budgets low.

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