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Ruby anniversary is flaming-o amazing!

Flamingos Bermuda and Miami are some of Blackpool Zoo's oldest residents and will be spending their 40th Christmas as a couple at the attraction this year

Flamingos Bermuda and Miami are some of Blackpool Zoo's oldest residents and will be spending their 40th Christmas as a couple at the attraction this year

Bermuda and Miami are a real couple of love birds.

The flamingos’ love story has spanned four decades and continues to amaze keepers at Blackpool Zoo with their unwavering commitment to one another – despite not being a species to mate for life.

Now the pair are preparing to spend their 40th Christmas together along with their daughter, Onandi, and 19 other members of the colony.

And they are currently the focus of a study being carried out by the zoo and Exeter University tracking social interactions between flamingos and initial results of this, dubbed Facebook For Flamingos, indicate the pair will mate for life.

John Paul Houston, Blackpool Zoo’s senior bird keeper, said: “Not all flamingos mate for life but our records show this pair have stuck together for the past 40 years.

“It is highly unlikely they would re-pair if one of them were to die.

“They spend a lot of time on their own, away from the group, and it reminds me of watching a little old couple just spending time together on Blackpool Prom.”

The duo, named after their birthplaces, are some of the East Park Drive attraction’s oldest residents, having been some of the first flamingos to settle in the 32-acre park.

Bird keepers at the zoo have said the successes of their breeding programmes since have been largely down to the influence of the 
Caribbean couple.

Mr Houston added: “As they were some of the first flamingos to settle here at Blackpool Zoo we really do owe a lot of our breeding success to them establishing a harmonious group and initialising breeding behaviours and that will continue long into the future.”

Mum Bermuda has never been one to ruffle feathers but dad Miami has ruled the roost since settling in to the zoo in the summer of 1973, one year after its opening and just a few weeks after Bermuda arrived.

Mr Houston said: “Miami has always been our lead flamingo but his advancing years means that he is taking more of a step back now – you could say he is getting ready to 
retire.

“His daughter, Onandi, is showing signs of being a leader though, so she may take on the family mantel.”

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