Famous Blackpool rock firm changes name

Sales and Marketing Manager Gary Bucci and MD Ian Atkinson at the factory  Coronation Rock, Blackpool, has changed its name to Coronation Candy and is expanding into new lines after investment
Sales and Marketing Manager Gary Bucci and MD Ian Atkinson at the factory Coronation Rock, Blackpool, has changed its name to Coronation Candy and is expanding into new lines after investment
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A business which has produced Blackpool’s famous sea-side rock for generations has changed its name with plans for expansion.

Coronation Rock has become Coronation Candy after two new directors invested in the 90-year-old firm.

Coronation Candy

Coronation Candy

It was started by Alex Bolton in 1927 and for many years had its factory on Cherry Tree Road North in Marton.

Now it has a factory and visitors centre at Amy Johnson Way near the airport.

Late last year Gary Bucci joined as sales and marketing director and Colin Levene as director of finance and strategy. They will assist managing director Ian Atkinson with new products and ideas.

The firm is to install new machinery for new lines such as candy canes and to automate production so they can start selling at more retailers.

Gary Bucci said: “The idea is to take it to the next level and open up new markets such as the multiples.

“The way to do that is to automate some of the lines and to bring in new lines such as candy canes which we could not do in Blackpool before, but we will also be continuing the traditional handmade rock and humbugs too.

“We still have our viewing gallery and factory tours but we have plenty of room for new machinery. It is a very exciting time for Coronation Candy.”

The firm has made sticks of rock for the likes of Winston Churchill, Elton John, Lady Diana and Gracie Fields, and last year had a visit from Strictly Come Dancing stars Louise Redknapp and Kevin Clifton who were in the resort filming the Blackpool Tower Ballroom edition of the BBC show. It held a Guinness Record for the biggest stick of rock 14ft long and nearly 70 stone.

See also: Rock firm busy despite recession