Letters - October 17, 2011

Plaque and bench dedication at Claremont Community Centre, in memory of Supt Gerry Richardson. Pictured at the bench are Supt Richardson's widow Maureen and Chief Supt Richard Debicki.
Plaque and bench dedication at Claremont Community Centre, in memory of Supt Gerry Richardson. Pictured at the bench are Supt Richardson's widow Maureen and Chief Supt Richard Debicki.
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FOLLOWING the tragic murder of Superintendent Gerry Richardson on August 23 1971, Gerry’s rotarian colleagues at The Rotary Club of Blackpool North established a charitable trust in his memory.

The aims were close to Gerry’s heart in that the Superintendent Gerald Richardson Memorial Youth Trust seeks to support youth development.

Since the trust was formed, over £250,000 has been allocated in grants and over 16,000 young people have been assisted.

As this year was the 40th anniversary of Gerry’s untimely death, the trustees felt it was appropriate to mark the occasion and celebrate Gerry’s wonderful legacy.

A dinner was held at the Sponsors Lounge of Blackpool Football Club with over 220 people attending.

It was so pleasing to see the community had not forgotten Gerry and local church-goers and residents organised a memorial service at St Paul’s Church, Egerton Road, on the morning of the dinner.

Following the service, the Mayor of Blackpool Coun Joan Greenhalgh unveiled a plaque at the Claremont Community Centre to Gerry and the other brave officers involved.

The trustees are most grateful to all at The Gazette for their support in feature articles and the commemorative events.

A sincere thank you to all involved and the support received will ensure Gerry’s name will not be forgotten and his legacy will live on ensuring many more young people will be assisted.

JEFFREY MEADOWS,

Trustee,

Superintendent Gerald Richardson Memorial Youth Trust

I JUST want to thank the nurses, podiatrists and carers for all the care and attention they have given to me over the last three years since I fell and broke my hip.

They are all angels and I thank them from the bottom of my heart.

MARGARET CRILLEY,

Lunedale Avenue,

Blackpool

OCTOBER marks the 1O year anniversary since the start of UK military intervention in Afghanistan.

While much news on Afghanistan centres on the potential withdrawal of military troops, I would like to draw readers’ attention to another aspect of the Afghan conflict – women’s forgotten role in building peace.

Afghanistan is still one of the most dangerous countries in the world to be a woman with 87 per cent of women reportedly having experienced at least one form of violence.

Access to basic healthcare is minimal, and maternal mortality is among the highest in the world.

Despite this, women have made progress. More girls are in school; women have the right to vote and stand for office and are doing so in good numbers.

Women’s involvement is crucial to ensuring a just and sustainable peace for all Afghans.

I am standing with Afghan women and CARE International UK, in making this demand to our government.

Readers can join me by visiting www.careinternational.org.uk/campaigns and signing the petition.

BARBARA WILLCOCK,

Bipsham