Letters - November 15, 2012

The War Memorial in Thornton
The War Memorial in Thornton
1
Have your say

I ATTENDED the service at Thornton war memorial and was delighted to see a large number of people of all ages, including representatives from local schools, there to pay their respects.

Unfortunately the ceremony was disrupted by the incessant noise of the traffic which was allowed to pass, apart from during the minute’s silence and when the members of the procession paraded at the end of the service.

One lady had to walk away as she was so upset because of the noise and the disruption it caused.

It was impossible to hear the service.

Is it too much to ask for the traffic to be stopped or
 diverted for the duration of 
the ceremony.

For goodness sake this is only once a year when we come together as a community to pay our respects.

P. JENKINS,

Fleetwood Road North,

Thornton.

THE service at the Cenotaph in Thornton was spoilt by the horrendous traffic, with cars, lorries and buses roaring through.

It is too much to ask for the traffic to be stopped while the service is on.

A lot of people were very upset and it spoilt a very precious hour to many people, me included.

MRS BOND,

Thornton.

IF motorists must park on pavements please think about us disabled folks in wheelchairs or on scooters, plus mums with prams and the blind.

If every driver had to spend a week in a wheelchair and had to face every day and the obstacles that fit motorists put in our way, then maybe they would not use all of the pavement when parking.

It’s no fun trying to get past them, then the drop kerbs are blocked by parked cars, then after they have gone home the pavements are a mass of mud.

It only takes a bit of thought for others, or is it a case of “I’m parked, to hell with everyone else!”

If a parking warden was to walk down All Saints Road in Bispham on Saturdays when the football is on, they would write that many tickets it would make enough to pay their wages for a month or more.

Please think of others who are not as fit.

GEOFF MANN,

Portway,

Bispham.

THE three month trial of free breakfast provisions for all primary school pupils in Blackpool from January is something with which I agree (Gazette November 13).

Sadly, too many children are going to school on an empty stomach and therefore finding it difficult to concentrate and get the most out of the school day.

While I hope funding can be found within the council budget to ensure this trial becomes a permanent feature, this measure does not excuse parents not feeding their children in the first place.

PAUL NUTTALL,

UKIP North West MEP.