Letters - November 10, 2011

England's Kevin Davies (centre) starts the match on the bench next to goalkeeper Ben Foster (left) and Jack Wilshere (right) during the Euro 2012 Qualifing match at Wembley Stadium, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday October 12, 2010. See PA Story: SOCCER England. Photo credit should read: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Use subject to FA restrictions. Editorial use only. Commercial use only with prior written consent of the FA. No editing except cropping. Call +44 (0)1158 447447 or see www.paphotos.com/info/ for full restrictions and further information.

England's Kevin Davies (centre) starts the match on the bench next to goalkeeper Ben Foster (left) and Jack Wilshere (right) during the Euro 2012 Qualifing match at Wembley Stadium, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday October 12, 2010. See PA Story: SOCCER England. Photo credit should read: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Use subject to FA restrictions. Editorial use only. Commercial use only with prior written consent of the FA. No editing except cropping. Call +44 (0)1158 447447 or see www.paphotos.com/info/ for full restrictions and further information.

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I COULD not believe it when I read FIFA has forbidden the players of the England football team to wear a poppy on their shirts when they play Spain this weekend.

This decision is appalling.

The wearing of the poppy is a mark of respect to remember all the servicemen and women who died in two world wars to give us the freedom and democracy we all now have. Without the sacrifice made by these brave young men and women we wouldn’t be here today.

The decision by FIFA is even more disgusting when one considers we are playing Spain, a country where thousands of young British men and women went to fight against fascism, many of whom never returned home.

I feel so incensed over this matter that I even feel the players should refuse to play at all if this decision by FIFA is not withdrawn.

That may seem an alarming thing for them to contemplate, but I feel this is a situation where it is absolutely essential that the England players make a stand to honour the memory of all our wonderfully brave men and women who died so they could live, and yes, be here today to play this match at all.

Our government must make it known to FIFA how disgusted the country is with their disgraceful ruling, and tell them in no uncertain terms that the England team will take to the field proudly wearing the Remembrance Day poppy on their shirts for all to see, come what may.

JACK FORSHAW,

Sower Carr Lane,

Hambleton

l REMEMBRANCE Day each year understandably focuses on death, mourning and redemptive sacrifice. However, it is perhaps worth remembering that it was not always so.

For some 20 years after the Great War of 1914-18 it was commonplace for Armistice Day (as it was then called) to be celebrated with parties and fashionable balls. There was mourning and respect for the dead but the main focus was on celebrating victory over the Germans. Indeed, many veterans of that war refused to participate in Armistice Day because as one said: ‘it would be like attending my own funeral’.

Today it is right and proper to mourn those who have died. Their relatives also deserve our condolences and respect.

Nevertheless, let us not forget to celebrate also our military achievements.

COLONEL (retired) BARRY CLAYTON,

Fieldfare Close,

Cleveleys.

THE death of a motorcyclist at the junction of Carr Lane and Sower Carr Lane in Hambleton is just the latest in a long line of similar incidents at this very dangerous junction.

The A588 is so dangerous they have even made a TV programme about it, Killer Roads, out later in the year.

Wyre’s rural councillors have even gone as far as using money given to them for good works to put up speed warning signs at this junction.

Time and time again the powers that be have been made aware of this lethal junction, but so far all that has been done is a study (big deal).

In the meantime road users are dying.

COUN GORDON McCANN,

Preesall

IF metal is such a valuable commodity, why does no one seem to want to recycle drinks cans in our town?

As a Blackpool resident, I am expected to use my blue bin for recycling such items.

I may even be penalised if I don’t.

For the thousands of visitors to the resort, however, it is a different story.

On the Promenade for instance, I have only seen one recycling point, near the Sandcastle Waterpark – and this isn’t eyecatching.

One was set fire to at Gynn Square, but at Bispham – end of the lights – where many drink from cans and bottles, there are just overflowing ordinary bins.

Holidaymakers in particular probably won’t have recycling on their agenda but basic recycling points, such as a bin in a can shape, for example, would at least prompt responsible disposal.

Lack of recycling goes beyond Blackpool – rubbish collectors on trains and planes never seem to make any effort in recycling cans and bottles while many European countries are way behind the UK in caring for the world’s resources. However, if Blackpool ups its game, with extra facilities, and generates extra awareness of recycling, then others may just follow us for the better.

PAUL ROBATHAN,

Davenport Avenue,

Bispham.

CONGRATULATIONS to Blackpool Council for the giant size Comedy Carpet on Blackpool Promenade.

It really is something to be proud of, but don’t sweep under the carpet the person who designed it and the people who were responsible for constructing it.

Gordon Young from Hull (pictured) designed this public artwork which was constructed in a former fish factory in Hull. Young started his career as a street artist and found fame in Hull with the pavement fish trail.

He was delighted to be asked to design the carpet, which took five years to make. The paint was made never to fade, by a painting firm in Rugby Street, Hull.

The production process was overseen by a team led by city craftsman Andy Sawyer.

I think it is a wonderful lasting achievement for both Blackpool and the city of Hull and for the comedians whose memories are now etched in stone forever.

STEVE KING,

Cleveleys