Letters - March 31

Staff at the Easterleigh Animal Sanctuary in St Annes were today coming to terms with the devastating fire which killed many of the animals.'Danielle Stimpson arranges a floral tribute in front of the burnt-out building (because of asbestos risk all staff are having to wear face masks). PIC BY ROB LOCK'25-3-2011
Staff at the Easterleigh Animal Sanctuary in St Annes were today coming to terms with the devastating fire which killed many of the animals.'Danielle Stimpson arranges a floral tribute in front of the burnt-out building (because of asbestos risk all staff are having to wear face masks). PIC BY ROB LOCK'25-3-2011
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Have your say

HOW saddened I am to read of recent outbreaks of fire in St Annes.

I sympathise with the scouts and also the owner of the minibus and garage, as well as Easterleigh Animal Sanctuary.

The majority of Easterleigh animals have been abandoned and some are neglected, and have experienced enough trauma without this.

The staff and volunteers work hard under difficult conditions, especially during the dark, cold winter months.

No animals are turned away and every effort is made to provide veterinary care and, hopefully, the chance of a new home.

Please, anyone that is able to, give a donation to this worthy cause.

LOUISE EADON

St Annes

I WANT to bring readers’ attention to a new dementia campaign, launched by the Government, highlighting the symptoms of dementia and why an early diagnosis is importants.

Only 39 per cent of people with dementia in Blackpool have received a formal diagnosis.

There can be many early signs of dementia, from forgetting the names of friends or everyday objects to feeling confused. I encourage anyone who is worried to see their GP.

If you are worried about signs or symptoms of dementia speak to your GP or visit www.nhs.uk/dementia or www.alzheimers.org.uk.

MARGARET IRVING

Alzheimers Society

COULD we thank Mrs K Burnley for highlighting a safety issue on Cleveleys Prom (Letters March 21).

Just to clarify, the “steps” she refers to were designed as part of the sea wall to break up the tide and not to provide regular access to the beach.

Separate steps with landings and handrails have been provided at regular intervals along the Promenade.

Coastal conditions change quickly, including the depositing of sand, shingle and seaweed on the revetments, or the formation of soft spots on the beach.

While Wyre Council carries out regular inspections and makes every effort to remove potential hazards, the final responsibility for health and safety has to lie with the public.

Warning notices can be found along the seafront, and we ask people to read them.

GARRY PAYNE

Director of regeneration

Wyre Council