Letters - March 14

Soldiers salute after placing pictures among floral tributes at the 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment's barracks in Warminster, Wiltshire after the six soldiers were killed in the single worst enemy attack on British troops in Afghanistan since operations began in 2001. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday March 8, 2012. The servicemen were on patrol yesterday when their Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle was caught in an explosion. See PA story DEFENCE Afghanistan. Photo credit should read: Tim Ireland/PA Wire
Soldiers salute after placing pictures among floral tributes at the 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment's barracks in Warminster, Wiltshire after the six soldiers were killed in the single worst enemy attack on British troops in Afghanistan since operations began in 2001. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday March 8, 2012. The servicemen were on patrol yesterday when their Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle was caught in an explosion. See PA story DEFENCE Afghanistan. Photo credit should read: Tim Ireland/PA Wire
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THE recent tragic deaths of six British soldiers in Afghanistan demonstrates yet again how dangerous this war zone is, particularly for the infantry.

The foot soldier is heavily dependent on the Warrior Armoured Infantry Fighting Vehicle for transit between locations. Unfortunately, the Warrior is far from being invulnerable.

Military explosives – thousands were left behind by the Russians – can easily be formed into shaped charges by the Taliban and used as Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).

The Taleban has access to some very intelligent people. Hence every time we increase the armour plating on a vehicle they increase the explosive power of the IEDs.

There is only one way to allow soldiers to patrol and fight and operate while reducing the loss of life from IEDs and that is to move by transport helicopter.

These save lives just as they did in South Armagh.

The lack of money spent by the Ministry of Defence on this type of helicopter is, therefore, a disgrace.

Vast sums have been spent, are being spent, on useless projects.

It is a scandal that shop-window items have been given priority over lives.

Colonel (retired) Barry Clayton

Fieldfare Close

Cleveleys

I AM studying Britain’s adoption process as part of my doctoral research and am interested to speak on the telephone to anyone who is thinking about or has made some inquiries about adopting a child.

The reason I am studying this is to better understand why there is a huge mismatch in adoption, with only one in 10 enquiries from people interested in adopting a child resulting in an adoption taking place.

The conversation would last just 20 minutes and would be confidential and findings anonomised. There is no link between my study and any adoption application that might be made. It is hoped the research will result in a larger and more diverse pool of adopters for those children waiting for adoption.

Please contact Teri Rogers at adoption.port.ac.uk or telephone 02392 842838 to arrange an interview.

Teri Rogers

THE shared space outcry for the Promenade is ridiculous.

Give it time and everyone will wonder what the fuss was about.

It’s improved a once-shoddy area of town that will soon look even better when the Tower front is revealed.

The standard of the work on the paving and roads, however, leaves a lot to be desired.

Once the workmen clear away, it will be even easier for people to cross.

To the future!

Paul Elms

North Shore