Letters - January 8, 2013

Pictures Martin Bostock.' Memorial service to mark 30th anniversary of the sea tragedy at Gynn Square, Blackpool.' PCs Colin Morrison, Gordon Connolly and Angela Bradley drowned while trying to save a tourist, Alistair Anthony who had gone into the Irish Sea in order to rescue his pet dog on January 5, 1983.

Pictures Martin Bostock.' Memorial service to mark 30th anniversary of the sea tragedy at Gynn Square, Blackpool.' PCs Colin Morrison, Gordon Connolly and Angela Bradley drowned while trying to save a tourist, Alistair Anthony who had gone into the Irish Sea in order to rescue his pet dog on January 5, 1983.

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THE sight of so many people turning out to pay their respects to three police officers who died while trying to save a tourist in Blackpool 30 years ago was heart-warming.

The tragedy of 1983 when PCs Colin Morrison, Gordon Connolly and Angela Bradley went into the sea to try and save Alastair Anthony (who himself had gone in to try and save his dog) is one which I remember vividly from when I was a child.

It went from the front pages of newspapers to one which was brought into lessons in school in a bid to teach youngsters about the dangers of the sea.

Many tragedies and loss of life, in many cases greater than the four people who lost their lives here, are often forgotten, but not so this terrible event inBlackpool. And neither should it.

These three police officers gave their lives in a bid to save a man in trouble. This must have had a massive effect on their colleagues and Lancashire Police in general.

I agree with Chief Supt 
Richard Debecki who said “this serves as a poignant reminder of the dangers of the sea.”

Particularly so in a week when another person has apparently drowned off the coast of Blackpool.

The tributes to PCs Morrison, Connolly and Bradley were right and fitting 30 years on.

Their heroism should never be forgotten, neither should the terrible power of the sea.

VICKI KAY

Kirkham

NOT being a Lancashire bloke, I read, for the first time and with interest the Gazette article concerning PCs Morrison, Connolly and Bradley and their courageous attempt at rescuing Mr Morris 30 years ago.

The article was heartbreaking yet strangely heart-warming.

To hear that these officers disregarded their own safety to try to protect that of Mr Morris brought home the state of our nation today.

Were the same scenario to happen today, I rather fancy a different outcome.

While I would never expect a public servant to endanger their own life in the course of carrying out their duty, the three fallen officers committed themselves to serving the people who, ultimately provided the taxes to pay for their salaries. This is something many police officers forget these days; the UK-wide county constabularies are in place to serve the people and to protect them and when I see the poor performance of a few officers, I am saddened. I am also saddened by the actions of the do-gooders that stop our public servants from doing their jobs efficiently and effectively.

In days gone by, a police officer would never have needed to use the kind of restraint methods they use nowadays. His or her stern words were enough to put the most irreverent of people back into place.

STEVE BROWN,

Blackpool.

NEW Year can be a wonderful time – a time of new beginnings with fresh ways of thinking. This year I have met so many people who have been stuck in the illusion that life is a soap opera.

It isn’t. Life is an adventure but you need to ‘make it so’. You have the power to create, to hope and to think and your life can be as rich as you make up your mind to be. In 2013 you have yet another opportunity to make life work for you. Twleve new months in which you can set and achieve your goals.

The plans that you make for 2013 need to be real. Create great goals and set up a way in which you can really take charge of 2013 and make it your best year ever. Remember, if it doesn’t bring you joy it certainly doesn’t have a place in 2013.

SHIRLEY

CALDWELL

Life and Business Coach

Poulton

THE news that the Chilcot Inquiry into the Iraq invasion will not report its findings until September 2013 at the earliest is scandalous. Set up in 2009 it was supposed to publish its findings by December 2011. The inquiry has already cost over £6m. By September this will have risen to at least £7.5m.

The reason given, namely the delay in getting classified documents from the government, is hard to believe. It is more likely to be the fear of exposing those in this country who were responsible for an unwarranted invasion plus not wishing to ruffle the feathers of several well-known American politicians and their neocon advisers.

DR BARRY CLAYTON

Cleveleys