Letters - February 29

After protests over the height of the barriers at the entrances to the Teanlowe car park a minibus carrying autistic children crashed into one of the barriers.'Evina Davis from Concerned Residents Of Poulton (CROP) and Centre Manager George McCaffer inspect the bent barrier. PIC BY ROB LOCK'2-2-2012
After protests over the height of the barriers at the entrances to the Teanlowe car park a minibus carrying autistic children crashed into one of the barriers.'Evina Davis from Concerned Residents Of Poulton (CROP) and Centre Manager George McCaffer inspect the bent barrier. PIC BY ROB LOCK'2-2-2012
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Have your say

WITH regard to Poulton’s car park barriers controversy, your editorial comment summarises the whole essence of the problem (Gazette February 23).

Open discussion, consultation and co-operation in advance would have avoided these difficulties.

And now the barriers are to be fixed at a height of 2.6 metres, the white vans etc, which they were intended to prevent entering the car park, will now easily pass under them.

Myself and a number of volunteers who care about Poulton are preparing an entry in the Mary Portas initiative to hopefully gain funding to improve the town and make it a much more welcoming destination.

These barriers have the opposite effect.

They are ugly and have no function.

It’s not too late to get round the table and find a better solution.

JOHN BAILIE

Blackpool Old Road

Poulton

l THE Teanlowe car park barriers will serve no purpose if they are raised – who will they keep out?

Incidentally, it is easy enough for a determined driver to get on to the car park without even using the barrier entrances.

I suggest the solution, to what has become a ridiculously large problem, is that delivery van drivers, who refuse to use the designated areas for deliveries, should be given parking tickets which incur huge fines. They will soon get the message.

Any amendments and improvements to my ideas could easily be solved by all the interested parties getting together for a short consultation meeting.

E DAVIS, Poulton

I AM writing in response to the recently published figures on workplace deaths, which show that eight people were killed while at work in Lancashire in 2010/11, and 661 suffered a major injury.

I would urge businesses to focus on the real health and safety dangers that their employees face to help cut the number of deaths and major injuries in future.

However, it’s not surprising that employers are left confused about their health and safety responsibilities, when these stark figures contrast with a host of ‘health and safety gone mad’ stories in the media.

The health and safety made simple pages on the HSE website gives straightforward, step-by-step guidance on what you need to do – and no more.

It includes advice on how to report a serious incident, along with quick and easy online risk assessment tools.

For more information, visit the website www.hse.gov.uk/simple-health-safety.

DAVID SOWERBY

North West regional director

Health and Safety Executive