Letters - December 19

Prime Minister David Cameron and retail expert Mary Portas discuss her report in a cafe in Camden,  London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday December 13, 2011. Retail expert Mary Portas  has produced a report for the government on the decline of town centres, she says the growth of online and out-of-town shopping has left many areas "dying". She recommends getting town centres to run more like businesses to revive the High Street. See PA story INDUSTRY Retail. Photo credit should read: Kirsty Wigglesworth/PA Wire
Prime Minister David Cameron and retail expert Mary Portas discuss her report in a cafe in Camden, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday December 13, 2011. Retail expert Mary Portas has produced a report for the government on the decline of town centres, she says the growth of online and out-of-town shopping has left many areas "dying". She recommends getting town centres to run more like businesses to revive the High Street. See PA story INDUSTRY Retail. Photo credit should read: Kirsty Wigglesworth/PA Wire
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just how much has Mary Portas been paid for this nonsensical report into our dying high streets and this from a government which supposedly has no spare cash.

My parents were for many years small shopkeepers so I well remember what our busy high streets were like in those lovely far-off days.

But for goodness’ sake we are now in the 21st century and the days of the supermarkets and online shopping are here to stay whether we like it or not and no amount of “expert advice” will stop their inevitable advance.

With the busy lives people live these days, have they really time to traipse in and out of individual shops for one thing after another?

No the life and times of the small shopkeeper will probably be another one for the history books sadly.

MRS M BENNSON

Mooretree Drive

Blackpool

THE council says residents can “ask for H-bar markings to be painted for a fee of approximately £65, however these markings are advisory only” (Gazette, December 13).

But this is not true. It depends on whether or not the H-bar markings are painted alongside a dropped footway or kerb.

The status where they do not accompany a dropped footway or kerb appears to be that they are advisory only.

If this is the case why do Blackpool Council charge £65 for painting the lines?

Why is the council charging for something that is pointless and unenforceable?

The actual status of an H-bar marking where it is painted across a dropped footway or kerb is that it is a non-regulatory sign which is nationally recognised.

The marking alone has no legal standing but it should be noted that under Part 6 (86) of the Traffic Management Act 2004 any vehicle that parks across a dropped footway or kerb crossing point is in breach of the legislation and liable to receive a penalty charge notice issued by Civil Enforcement Officers.

In addition the police could take action for the offences of wilful or unnecessary obstruction if they so wish.

In other words the resident has taken steps to bring the dropped footway or kerb to the notice of potential illegal parkers and if a vehicle driver either doesn’t know the law or decides to take a risk, they deserve everything they get.

CJ WELCH

Poulton

SO Blackpool has the lowest average earnings in the country. But it will always be so.

A reliance on temporary part-time seasonal work will always condemn us to penury.

Not much chance of industry coming here then either.

As long as we import everything from China instead of making it ourselves we will be unemployed locally and nationally.

But then we would lose the pool of cheap labour, wouldn’t we?

P SMITH

Lincoln Road

Blackpool