Letters - August 9

Pictures Martin Bostock.'Hotelier Tony Adams of the Maxime hotel has dropped out of Blackpool's Council's hotel Accreditation scheme saying they are not playing the part to help tourism. He says the derelict Sherwood Hotel next door, which is infested with pigeon droppings and has been used as a drug factory puts guests off.

Pictures Martin Bostock.'Hotelier Tony Adams of the Maxime hotel has dropped out of Blackpool's Council's hotel Accreditation scheme saying they are not playing the part to help tourism. He says the derelict Sherwood Hotel next door, which is infested with pigeon droppings and has been used as a drug factory puts guests off.

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Have your say

LIKE Tony Adams of the Maxime Hotel (Gazette July 27), we have also decided not to renew our accreditation with Visit Britain.

Our reasons for not renewing are a few. The main issue is guests are not looking at how many stars your guest house or hotel has.

I asked 10 people, who had booked from the internet, why they had chosen us. All had different answers, perhaps looking for car parking etc, not one mentioned it was because we are a three star accredited business.

When I asked them if this was an important issue to them, the answer was no, because they checked out our guest house on Trip Advisor, as does everyone who books via the internet.

It does not bring in any more business, you cannot charge any more for your rooms.

Also, the way Visit Britain works out the standards of your business is hugely unfair. The payment is £255, as a small business that hits us hard.

GAYNOR HOWELL

Thornhill Hotel

Wellington Road

Blackpool

I HAVE been a regular visitor and done business here in Blackpool for more than 40 years.

I came down last week and was shocked to see the state of the Promenade between Central and North piers.

Before coming down I had checked to see how the work was getting on, and this led me to believe it was near completion by the end of June. It seems like they are trying to get too much done at the one time.

The council owe holidaymakers a big apology.

No wonder the numbers are dwindling.

PETER GOW

Hazlehead Drive

Dundee

WITH his simplistic ‘drive safely and keep to the limit’ response, S. Knight (Letters August 2) totally misses the point of the discussion regarding speed cameras.

Firstly, and most significantly, driving safely and keeping to the speed limit are two separate issues. It is quite possible to be safe above the limit and dangerous below it.

When speed cameras were introduced we were told it was because ‘the majority of road accidents are caused by speeding’. Figures from the Department of Transport and the Road Research Laboratory put this nearer 10 per cent than 50 per cent.

Most opponents and critics of these monstrosities do not want a licence for ‘any speed anywhere’. They just want 90 per cent of the problem – established by the same organisations as inadequate driver education and poor road engineering – to be tackled, rather than the 10 per cent in which excessive speed (not necessarily over the prevailing limit) is a ‘contributory factor’ (not the cause).

This is borne out by the fact road casualties have been declining for the last 50 years, long before speed cameras were invented. In fact, the decline has slowed in the last 10 years with cameras.

Those who claim that cameras have been a success might ponder the possibility they have contributed to that slowdown as traffic police patrols have been reduced.

RICHARD HOOK

Devonshire Road

Blackpool