Letters - August 2, 2012

Councillor Tony Williams

Councillor Tony Williams

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MY comments in The Gazette regarding the essential review of all departments of the council have been met with apparent approval from all sides of the political arena and local residents.

Not many council officers have worked in the private sector where profit and accountability are the key elements of success.

They are recruited via specialist media and will have held similar positions in local government and, despite council training, will have limited customer care experience. Yet this is despite the whole council being a massive customer care centre.

Everything that happens within its walls has a resident focus or end effect. Public opinion has to be considered and acted upon yet quite often it’s considered by some to be negative and treated with contempt.

The council is a business and must be run as such. We need more experienced private sector manager champions with a history of proven success to bring a higher level of customer care into all processes.

I am personally sick and tired of hare-brained schemes that promise to make Blackpool the ‘Town of The Future’. It’s not bricks and mortar that make a place great it’s the people that live there. We need to address the unemployed, weed out the unemployable, start a non-council managed Jobs Task Force, stop printing expensive glossy industry brochures.

Respect the residents, cut the talking shops, demolish the decay, clean up the town in every aspect, and deliver the jobs.

Then start building the promised Utopia.

COUN TONY WILLIAMS

Conservative Group Leader

Blackpool

I HAVE just been to a wonderful show at the Opera House in the Winter Gardens and what a magnificent performance.

It was called Strictly Centre Stage by Nicky Figgins, she’s a miracle worker.

I’ve never seen such talent and finesse - from the young children, dancing, singing, and their band.

Tom Rolfe was very funny, Wei Wei and partner at ballet wonderful, and all the singers too.

The audience coming out into St Johns Square were so happy and cheery looking, saying they could only find a show like this in wonderful full of life Blackpool.

MARGARET CRAWFORD

Ashfield Road

Bispham

WHILE I have every sympathy with someone who has a disability, things are getting completely out of control with these scooters.

I was shopping the other day in Cleveleys when I was aware of something behind me trying to get past.

I turned round and nearly the whole of the pavement was taken up with a double scooter complete with canopy with a man and woman sitting side by side.

Surely this cannot be legal on the pavement.

MRS STANSFIELD,

Norbreck

I WAS born and bred in Blackpool and have used the bus services on and off for many years, but never have I known it to be in such a bad state as it is now.

I have had plenty of problems in recent years due to buses not turning up on time or not turning up at all, leaving early, buses going the wrong way.

On three occasions at least I waited for the number nine to arrive at the stop on Topping Street only to witness it turn left from Talbot Road onto Dickson Road, which meant I had to walk all the way to Bispham late at night and in winter.

When I have telephoned to complain, all they do is make excuses such as it’s due to the Illuminations the bus is late, or some other reason. These days we are advised to use public transport as a way of cutting down on road traffic, car emissions and also as a safety precaution - rather than walking late at night - but it seems we can’t rely on it.

I did live in London for two years in the mid eighties and the transport system there was excellent.

Not much hanging around for buses or trains.

Blackpool is a small place by comparison and after years of problems with time keeping etc, they still can’t get it right.

After all they make these timetables but it’s they who cannot adhere to them.

DAVID B. NOON,

Kincraig Place,

Blackpool

WE read with concern the recent Scope report which revealed nearly half of disabled people find that attitudes towards them have worsened over the past year, with 84 per cent believing hostility might be due to negative media coverage about benefit cheats.

Our own research echoes these findings, with only a fifth of people on low incomes believing that those claiming benefits have a right to do sot.

These stigmas are in spite of the fact around a third of all disabled adults aged 25 to retirement are living in low-income households.

Low incomes are often compounded by the fact one’s disability can incur significant extra costs.

We would urge anyone who is disabled and struggling with their finances to visit our free and confidential Turn2us Benefits Calculator at www.turn2us.org .org.uk which is designed to help people work out which welfare benefits and charitable grants they might be entitled to.

ROB TOLAN,

Head of Policy and Research,

Elizabeth Finn Care.