Letters - April 18, 2013

The coffin bearing the body of Baroness Thatcher makes it way to St Paul's Cathedral, central London for her funeral service. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday April 17, 2013. See PA story FUNERAL Thatcher. Photo credit should read: David Crump/Daily Mail /PA Wire

The coffin bearing the body of Baroness Thatcher makes it way to St Paul's Cathedral, central London for her funeral service. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday April 17, 2013. See PA story FUNERAL Thatcher. Photo credit should read: David Crump/Daily Mail /PA Wire

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Have your say

Some mixed views

The passing of the Iron Lady seems to have unleashed waves of emotion – much of it negative.

Shouldn’t we allow the frail, old lady she eventually became to rest in peace?

However, the spending of a possible £10m on her funeral via the frittering of taxpayers’ money is not acceptable, especially when this current, punitive government is hell bent on cutting everything else – eg jobs, services, benefits, livelihoods.

Susan Barker

Fordway Avenue

Layton

I find it ironic the woman who stopped funeral grants for all gets hers free. I don’t think people would be so angry if it was just a funeral, but £10m in this time of hardship for half the country is a disgrace.

Why can’t Thatcher supporters send in the money to pay and see what kind of funeral she would get?

It would be nice if the Thatchers, one of the country’s richest families, could give the £10m to a charity in her name. But it’s the hard working class who give the most to charity.

Mary Flinders

Annan Crescent

Blackpool

Jacqui Morley ended her diatribe of hatred of Margaret Thatcher (and that’s what it was, however soft the verbiage!) with Marc Antony’s words: “I come to bury Caesar, not praise him.”

The lady did more good than bad in my eyes – and I’m 
both an ex-miner and a 
current pensioner.

But at least Ms Morley didn’t sink to the vicious mawling that came from one I once admired for her dramatic outbursts – Glenda Jackson. Ironically, the person I most expected to be violently scurrilous – Arthur Scargill – is almost exemplary.

Others should take a leaf from one of her greatest enemies and stay shtum!

Neil Kendall

Blackpool

I am not part of the loud protest brigade, as it seems to me we are actually feeding Mrs Thatcher’s ability to divide even in death.

Surely the way is to just let her family rightly sort out their feelings, but to be seeing such an amount used for a part State funeral when most don’t agree with it, and while there are people who are losing a few hundred pounds, disabled people are abused for false accusations of benefit fraud, all because we are in serious financial difficulties, is beyond comprehension.

Stephen Brookes

Bispham

Re Jacqui Morley’s piece on the ex -Prime Minister of this great country of ours.

I must take the opposite view.

She was the making of the country at that time.

The unions were all too powerful and the country was in danger of being overtaken by communist thinking left wingers. They had to be hauled in as the coal industry was failing anyway.

Yes, people lost jobs and that was sad but inevitable and she must have had misgivings about the situation that the mineworkers would find themselves in but the situation could not be allowed to develop where unions had the upper hand because they were all take and no give.

She got the poll tax wrong but she did a lot more good than bad. She may have seemed tough on the outside and she had to be, but underneath she was a mother and a wife and had more sensitivity than the men around her at the time of the Falklands crisis where she excelled herself.

She was the best peacetime leader of this country bar Winston Churchill and has such deserves her state funeral as these people only come along once in a lifetime and this should be celebrated and will as we shall see.

Terence R Wright

Blackpool

May I respectfully say how disappointed I was with Jacqui Morley’s recent article and, to my mind, unnecessary comments. Yes, you quite rightly defend freedom of speech but are you really happy within yourself to say, “That includes freedom to speak ill of the dead.” ?As a human being that really saddened me.

When you have enjoyed a journalist’s column for a few years, as I have yours, you get a feel for the writer’s personality and this article definitely seemed so out of character for you. But, the truth will out as they say. I can only comment that with freedom of speech and with it free will comes responsibility; self responsibility.

Jimmy Gilliard

Address supplied

I remember what it was like to grow up and work in a country bullied by a vested interest minority, a country weighed down by demarcation and false parameters invented to protect those very same interests. A country where unions deemed that, for example, a tradesman had to be an apprentice by the time they were 18 or always be ‘unskilled’.

And this while the rest of Europe were shrugging off the crucial pre-war need of left wing politics and developing freedom for the individual.Mrs Thatcher was nobody’s favourite person.

Even those who believed in what she was doing similarly cringed when she went into her falsetto oratory or bloody minded ruthlessness. But what she did was necessary to put the UK’s house in order.

We were like a company employing too many expensive tradesmen making less – and long out-dated – quality products while heading for bankruptcy. What she did was what was needed.

Tim Amor

Norbreck