Letters - 19 September 2011

Undated handout file video image issued by the Baha Mousa Public Inquiry of Corporal Donald Payne, formerly of the Queen's Lancashire Regiment, shouting and swearing at unidentified hooded Iraqi detainees, as they are forced to maintain painful "stress positions", which was played to the public inquiry into the death of hotel receptionist Baha Mousa, 26. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Thursday September 8, 2011. The British soldiers responsible for the death of Baha Mousa must face prosecution in the light of the damning public inquiry findings, lawyers for his family said. 'Inquiry chairman Sir William Gage's report names 19 members of UK forces, including three non-commissioned officers, who carried out assaults on Mr Mousa and nine other Iraqis held with him.'See PA story INQUIRY Mousa. Photo credit should read: Baha Mousa Public Inquiry/PA Wire ''NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people
Undated handout file video image issued by the Baha Mousa Public Inquiry of Corporal Donald Payne, formerly of the Queen's Lancashire Regiment, shouting and swearing at unidentified hooded Iraqi detainees, as they are forced to maintain painful "stress positions", which was played to the public inquiry into the death of hotel receptionist Baha Mousa, 26. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Thursday September 8, 2011. The British soldiers responsible for the death of Baha Mousa must face prosecution in the light of the damning public inquiry findings, lawyers for his family said. 'Inquiry chairman Sir William Gage's report names 19 members of UK forces, including three non-commissioned officers, who carried out assaults on Mr Mousa and nine other Iraqis held with him.'See PA story INQUIRY Mousa. Photo credit should read: Baha Mousa Public Inquiry/PA Wire ''NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people
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THE recent public inquiry report into the treatment of Iraqi prisoners by members of the QLR reveals behaviour that is shocking, shameful and totally inexcusable.

This fine regiment has had a major stain placed on its reputation that will take a very long time to remove.

Those officers involved, particularly the CO, Lt Col Mendonca, are the most culpable. Either they did not know what was going on, or they did but chose to ignore it. In either case, they were not fit to be officers.

In every recent major war a small number of British troops have committed well-documented atrocities against enemy POWs.

However abhorrent, these were committed in the heat of battle, and usually when fighting had been particularly fierce.

In the case in question, however, scandalous actions were used against defenceless prisoners in conditions well away from the war zone.

The excuse that torture was necessary in order to obtain intelligence will not wash.

Every time the behaviour of our troops falls below civilised standards, we forfeit the high moral ground and hand anti-western propaganda to our enemies on a plate.

Regrettably, some 150 more similar cases are being investigated.

Col BARRY CLAYTON (retd)

Fieldfare Close, Cleveleys

THANK you to Craig Fleming for his Memory Lane feature on Layton Hall (August 30). It was such a thrill to see what it looked like, and to read its very interesting history.

My mum Doris Ketterick, 98 next month, remembers going with her brother, who delivered newspapers there.

She remembers a row of cottages without gardens just lower down than Layton Hall – one of which was said to be haunted.

At the very end of Layton Road, with the corner of Newton Drive, my mum also remembers a cottage called Pepper Hill. This has since been developed into a lovely bungalow, which still has the original cobbled wall around it.

PAT EDWARDS

Newton Drive, Blackpool

n Don’t miss Memory Lane every Saturday and Tuesday – you never know which people or places from the Fylde coast’s rich history are waiting to be rediscovered.

I SEE having got rid of the clamping cowboys, we are now being fined for parking at a store we use.

My wife broke down in our car on Aldi car park, and was there for two hours waiting for the AA breakdown to arrive, and received a fine of £70 in the post.

The stores concerned, I assume, are getting a cut of the fine, and again the motorist is to be used as a cash cow.

I suggest that if we boycott these stores, they may wish to reconsider these charges to keep our custom.

JOHN SARGEANT

Blackpool