Wok a mess!

Rice stored at the wrong temperature. Below - The China Town Restaurant on Coronation Street, Blackpool.

Rice stored at the wrong temperature. Below - The China Town Restaurant on Coronation Street, Blackpool.

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A restaurant owner has been fined after rat droppings were found by grime busters behind a freezer in a Chinese restaurant.

The food hygiene inspectors also found a container of rice in the kitchen which had been cooked the day before at the China Town Restaurant.

The China Town Restaurant on Coronation Street, Blackpool.

The China Town Restaurant on Coronation Street, Blackpool.

The walls and floors were greasy, utensils and a hand basin were dirty and genetically modified foodstuff was being used without notifying customers at the restaurant on Coronation Street, Blackpool, a court heard.

Proprietor, Hok Chung, 53, who lives above the restaurant, pleaded guilty to eight offences of breaching food hygiene laws.

He was fined £875 with £330 costs and ordered to pay £20 victims’ surcharge by Blackpool magistrates.

Presiding magistrate, Christine Hamilton, told Chung: “We have a great deal of concern over this matter because of public health concerns.”

Lee Petrak, prosecuting for Blackpool Council, said food hygiene officers visited the China Town Restaurant on April 5 this year and found rat droppings, which appeared to have been there for some time, behind a chest freezer.

Rice cooked the day before was found in a colander and not at the correct temperature.

A hand basin was filthy, bare bricks were exposed on a wall, unprotected food touched the bottom of a freezer which could have caused cross-contamination and there were no notices telling customers genetically modified oil was being used in cooking.

Chung told magistrates, through an interpreter speaking Mandarin, that the restaurant had now been thoroughly cleaned and repaired.

He added that the rice mentioned by the food inspectors had been due to be thrown away, but had been too hot at that time to put in the bin.

He had agreed to the food inspectors’ request to throw the rice away, as it could be harmful to eat.

Chung said he usually operated the business alone except when it was the season and he employed part-time workers.

He said he did not know about the oil and he had bought it from the cash and carry.

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