We can cut it on the Premier stage!

Mac Barlow, right, (senior coach-Blackpool FC girls and ladies) with Laura Ivinson (Morecambe Ladies FC player and Blackpool Sports Centre duty manager)
Mac Barlow, right, (senior coach-Blackpool FC girls and ladies) with Laura Ivinson (Morecambe Ladies FC player and Blackpool Sports Centre duty manager)
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COULD a woman really hack it in the testosterone-charged world of the Premier League?

Well, the Fylde coast’s female footie players and managers certainly think so.

Former Northern Ireland manager Lawrie Sanchez sparked a debate when he predicted a female Premier League manager within the next 10 years.

Laura Ivinson, who lives in Beech Avenue, Blackpool, and plays for Morecambe FC Ladies thinks that gender should not come into it.

She said: “There’s no reason why a woman could not be as good, if not better, than a man. It would be great for the female game. Hopefully it would change people’s opinions of the female game.

“With female football being one of the fastest growing sports in the country, it would be a really positive thing.”

Blackpool Ladies Senior Coach Mac Barlow has been coaching at the club for six years and sees no reason for female managers to be overlooked, saying: “If someone’s qualified and can get the results then that’s all it should be about.

“I’d love a professional job in the men’s game. I want to progress as a coach as much as I can.”

Blackpool Ladies footballer Melissa Brown has already obtained her UEFA B coaching licence and is looking to progress in the field of women’s football.

“There’s a lot of decent female managers out there but it’s just a struggle to get noticed. England women’s manager Hope Powell is a brilliant role model for women wanting to get into coaching.

“I love coaching and I never want to stop, I just want to keep progressing.

“The dream for me would be managing England but I’d definitely say yes to a Premier League job!”

David Burgess, chief executive of the Lancashire Football Association, said confidence in the growth of females working in the male game is high.

It said: “The women’s game, especially in Lancashire, is really vibrant and as more women become involved they will filter through to higher and different roles and no doubt eventually to the managerial levels.

“We have Hope Powell in charge of the national women’s team and I have no doubt one day soon a Premier League Club may engage a woman into one of the managerial positions, possibly through the coaching role.”