Wallaby on the loose in Wyre?

The Winmarleigh Wallaby was photographed near Winmarleigh Hall in April. Below: The wallaby was captured near Carr End Lane, Stalmine.
The Winmarleigh Wallaby was photographed near Winmarleigh Hall in April. Below: The wallaby was captured near Carr End Lane, Stalmine.
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You might think you were hopping mad if you saw this jumping around in the dead of night.

But you wouldn’t be alone, as police have been taking reports of a mystery marsupial roaming about the woods around Winmarleigh and Nateby, near Garstang.

The Winmarleigh Wallaby was captured on camera on the road near Winmarleigh Hall.

The Winmarleigh Wallaby was captured on camera on the road near Winmarleigh Hall.

Officers heard about the creature – thought to be a kangaroo or wallaby – crossing a carriageway in Winmarleigh while they were running a rural crime operation in the area at the weekend.

Wyre PC Dave Kerfoot posted a photograph on the force’s Garstang and Over Wyre Facebook page.

He told The Gazette: “As far as we know it’s still out and about, it’s certainly an interesting one.

“We have been receiving reports of a kangaroo being on the loose in Winmarleigh and Nateby – at first, I suspected that it was just residents in Winmarleigh wanting a Winmarleigh Wallaby to rival the Pilling Panther.

“But when the photographic evidence came through we couldn’t really dispute that there was a wallaby, or a kangaroo, in the road.”

Jozanda Parkinson posted on the social networking website her suggestion that the animal is a wallaby belonging to the farm next door to Winmarleigh Hall.

She said: “It’s been living in the woods at the hall for a few weeks now and we’ve seen it numerous times.

“So it is definitely real!”

The animal has become a popular talking point among Wyre residents.

Kathryn Philpott posted on Facebook: “You’d best jump to it then if you want to catch it!”

And Caroline Scatterbrain-Jones wrote: “We saw the wallaby at Winmarleigh last weekend.”

A spokesman at Winmarleigh Hall confirmed the animal was a wallaby, but refused to comment further.

PC Dave Kerfoot says when he heard the claims about the Winmarleigh Wallaby, it conjured up a few memories of the Pilling Panther.

A concerned resident contacted police in January this year about a large black cat in the area.

At the time, PC Kerfoot said there had been several reports of a similar “panther-sized” animal around Pilling over the last few years, .

The force wildlife officer is notified about such sightings so information can be collated.

No-one at the Nateby Hall Farm was available.

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Not the first time a Wallaby has been on the loose:

WALLABY SPARKS M-WAY CHAOS

HOUDINI THE WALLABY’S MOVING HOME AFTER BRUSH WITH FREEDOM

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A guide to spotting a kangaroo or a wallaby

Kangaroos and wallabies are both marsupials, meaning mothers carry their young around in built-in pouches.

The easiest way to tell the difference between kangaroos and wallabies is by size – adult kangaroos are much taller than adult wallabies.

Kangaroos tend to be all one colour, whereas our wallabies are usually two to three different colours.

The marsupials can be identified by their teeth.

Wallabies are browsers, meaning the majority of their diet is made up of leaves from native trees, while kangaroos are grazers, which means the majority of their diet is grass.

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