Time capsule tells a village history story

Year Four pupils from Staining Primary School bury a time capsule The Heathers with Jones Homes' sales adviser Alison Chessman and site manager Simon Whittaker.
Year Four pupils from Staining Primary School bury a time capsule The Heathers with Jones Homes' sales adviser Alison Chessman and site manager Simon Whittaker.
0
Have your say

It has a heritage as rich as anywhere on the Fylde.

Now the history of fast-expanding Staining will forever be part of a new housing development in the area.

Pupils from Staining Primary School have been researching the background of the village up to the present day as part of a school project.

And they have placed their work into a time capsule which has now been buried in the grounds of The Heathers development on Chain Lane.

Children from Year Four at the school on Staining Road wrote down their favourite memories of a day out in Staining and put them in the capsule.

Also buried in the history pot were tickets to events, stories and photographs which will remain buried at The Heathers indefinitely.

Year Four teacher Melanie Craft said: “The children were delighted to be able to bury the time capsule at The Heathers as it added a really interactive element to their project.

“It was also an educational experience, learning much about Health and Safety on an active site, which is located just a short walk away from the school.”

The capsule marks developer Jones Homes’ first development in the area.

Sales and marketing director Julie Hardy said: “We are thrilled to have forged a partnership with Staining Primary School. It was our pleasure to welcome Year Four to The Heathers to bury a time capsule, assisting the pupils with their project.

“It was quite poignant that the children visited the development, placing their memories of Staining in the time capsule for future generations of children to discover.”

************

Capsule could provide a wealth of value in future

If the Staining Primary School capsule is ever uncovered, possibly hundreds of years from now, it is likely to prove highly interesting to the era’s historians.

Today’s historians suggest that items describing the daily lives of the people who create capsules is of far more worth than objects buried in pristine condition which don’t explain much at all of the time period.

And they say personal notes, pictures and documents would greatly increase the value of the buried treasure.

Follow us on twitter @The_Gazette and like our page on facebook to keep up with all the latest news.