Thug jailed for glass attack at sister’s wedding

Matthew Hudson was jailed for a vicious attack on a guest at his sister's wedding
Matthew Hudson was jailed for a vicious attack on a guest at his sister's wedding
  • A wedding guest who was glassed by the brother of the bride was lucky to survive the attack, a court heard
  • Plasterer Matthew Hudson, 22, cried as he was led to the cells to start a three-and-a-half-year jail term
  • But when the victim – a friend of the groom – left the party to walk home, Hudson went after him and attacked him with a glass, causing him life-threatening neck injuries
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A wedding guest who was glassed by the brother of the bride was lucky to survive the attack, a court heard.

Plasterer Matthew Hudson, 22, cried as he was led to the cells to start a three-and-a-half-year jail term for the vicious attack on the man at his sister’s wedding.

John Phelan who helped save the attack victim's life

John Phelan who helped save the attack victim's life

Both men were among guests who had been enjoying the celebrations in a marquee set up in the grounds of the groom’s parents’ farm in Wrea Green, near Kirkham.

But when the victim – a friend of the groom – left the party to walk home, Hudson went after him and attacked him with a glass, causing him life-threatening neck injuries.

The injured guest returned to the marquee where partygoers were horrified to see him bleeding heavily from his wound.

Two guests, who were trained medics, took over the first aid while the emergency services rushed to the scene.

He realises how close he came to losing his life

Hudson was arrested and his victim was taken to Royal Preston Hospital where he received emergency surgery for his injuries.

He has made a full physical recovery but has been left with scarring and the attack has had a serious impact on his social life, work and confidence, the court was told.

Wounding

Hudson, of Ash Lane, Kirkham, was convicted of unlawful wounding after denying a charge of causing grievous bodily harm with intent.

Judge Stuart Baker, sentencing, said: “Quite why you behaved in the way you did, no one is ever likely to know.

“He (the injured man), like you, realises how close he came to losing his life. He is troubled at night about the events that occurred and can’t fully understand why it happened.

“This incident occurred at what should have been an extremely happy and pleasant event.”

Guest John Phelan, a retained firefighter at Lytham, spoke after the incident of how he struggled to save the victim’s life.

He and his wife, Kimberly, fought to keep pressure on the wound to try and stem the bleeding.

Mr Phelan said: “He was very, very poorly and had lost a lot of blood.

“I heard later that if he had lost any more, he wouldn’t have made it.”

“I didn’t realise how serious it was at first.

“I didn’t have a clue until I realised how much blood he was losing. As soon as I saw how much it was, I knew it had to be stopped.

“I’ve had some training through Lancashire Fire and Rescue, but I didn’t expect anything like it. It was very difficult.”

Mr Phelan said guests got towels to try and stop the blood, as well as continuously taking the victim’s blood pressure and talking to him.

“He was conscious, but he wasn’t really with it,” he added.

Mr Phelan said it wasn’t until the following day that he and his wife fully understood the seriousness of the situation.

“We were both in shock when it finally set in,” he said.

“At the time we just focused on the job in hand, but afterwards I realised that with the amount of blood he had lost he might not make it.”