Tea party focus on fairer food trading

Highfield Humanities College (South Shore, Blackpool)  "Big Brew" Fairtrade Coffee Morning. The Mayor of Blackpool Councillor Sylvia Taylor with (from left), George Ogden, Ben David, Amie Straathof and Emma Campbell.
Highfield Humanities College (South Shore, Blackpool) "Big Brew" Fairtrade Coffee Morning. The Mayor of Blackpool Councillor Sylvia Taylor with (from left), George Ogden, Ben David, Amie Straathof and Emma Campbell.
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SCHOOLCHILDREN across the Fylde coast are encouraging their communities to engage with Fairtrade.

Schools have been marking Fairtrade Fortnight, running until March 10, hosting tea parties, stalls and art competitions to promote ethical trading and buying.

Young chefs at Christ The King Catholic Primary School, Grange Park, are today busy baking cookies and cakes made only with Fairtrade products to sell at a coffee morning tomorrow.

Pupils at Poulton St Chad’s CE Primary School, which is already recognised as a Fairtrade school, started their fortnight early, with a Fairtrade day on February 12.

A special tuck shop sold ‘fair break’ bars and juices and children then recycled their wrappers to create a collage as a lasting memento of their Fairtrade work.

Teacher Rosemary Brown said: “A Fairtrade enthusiast hoped to display the collages in shops around Poulton in order to promote and raise the profile of Fairtrade produce.”

Highfield Humanities College, South Shore, welcomed the Mayor and Mayoress of Blackpool, Sylvia Taylor and Julia Massey, for a coffee morning to promote fairtrade links and products on Thursday.

Teacher Michelle Nuttall said: “Being a Humanities College Fairtrade is something we do support.

“The coffee morning allowed people to sample Fairtrade, to show there’s no difference, and to keep up links with our local community too.”

Students at St Bede’s Catholic High School, Lytham, have used the skills honed from their Business and Enterprise College status to run a tuck shop selling Fairtrade produce during the fortnight.

The school, on Talbot Road, already has a well established Fairtrade group, led by Lay Chaplain Paula Burdess, which promotes ethical trading and educates others on development issues.

Year Eight pupil Imogen Boxell said: “It’s really important for younger children to understand what Fairtrade is about and how the decisions they make as consumers can benefit others.”

Year 11 pupils visited St Peter’s Catholic Primary School, Lytham, to talk to younger pupils about Fairtrade, giving a presentation on Taking Steps To Fairtrade last Friday.

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