Talks held on new village green

Consultation event by Richard Dumbreck's Singleton Trust at Singleton Village Hall, regarding the future of Singleton Village.
Consultation event by Richard Dumbreck's Singleton Trust at Singleton Village Hall, regarding the future of Singleton Village.
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Plans for a new village green have been discussed at a series of public meetings.

Singleton residents have been having their say at a number of consultation events organised by a landowner in the village.

A peace garden, to commemorate the victims of war, was also among the ideas touted at the meetings, held by Richard Dumbreck’s Singleton Trust - which owns land bequeathed by its organisation’s founder.

Around 80 villagers turned up to the latest meeting, held on Wednesday evening in the village hall, to discuss ideas about how Singleton could be developed in the long-term.

Trust chairman Keith Walker said: “I’m very pleased with the turnout and I’d like to thank all the people who have contributed.

“We’ve talked about a peace garden in the area, which would commemorate people who died in the wars but also celebrate peace.

“We’re definitely hoping to develop a village green too.

“Traffic calming is also a big issue and we’ve also talked about there being more facilities for young people too.”

If implemented, the new green area would be located close to the Miller Arms pub, adjacent to Weeton Road and Church Road.

Mr Walker said no plans were yet set in stone, and feedback from the meetings would be taken into consideration when deciding next steps.

He added: “I have to emphasise these are just potential ideas. We need to take stock of what feedback we get and we’re trying to phase in the different elements for these plans because it’s an

affordability issue.”

Attendees were aided by a number of maps and artist’s impressions drawn up to show how the village could potentially look in future. John Brown, from design firm Studio LK, which created the maps, said: “People have been talking about issues such as a lack of green space and we test the feasibility of how that could happen, then we’ve tried to put that on a map so it’s like a real life situation.”